erratic vs quicksilver what difference

what is difference between erratic and quicksilver

English

Alternative forms

  • erratick, erraticke, erratique (all obsolete)

Etymology

From Latin erraticus; compare Old French erratique.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈɹætɪk/
  • Rhymes: -ætɪk

Adjective

erratic (comparative more erratic, superlative most erratic)

  1. unsteady, random; prone to unexpected changes; not consistent
    Henry has been getting erratic scores on his tests: 40% last week, but 98% this week.
  2. Deviating from normal opinions or actions; eccentric; odd.
    erratic conduct

Antonyms

  • consistent

Derived terms

  • erratical
  • erratically
  • erraticness

Translations

Noun

erratic (plural erratics)

  1. (geology) A rock moved from one location to another, usually by a glacier.
    • 2003, Bill Bryson, A Short History of Nearly Everything, BCA 2003, p. 372:
      The term for a displaced boulder is an erratic, but in the nineteenth century the expression seemed to apply more often to the theories than to the rocks.
  2. Anything that has erratic characteristics.

Synonyms

  • (glaciers): dropstone

Translations

Anagrams

  • Cartier, cartier, cirrate, rice rat


English

Etymology

From Middle English quyk silver, quyksilver, quikselver, from Old English cwicseolfor (quicksilver, literally living silver) (see Latin argentum vivum) from its ability to move. See quick in the sense of “living”. Equivalent to quick +‎ silver. Cognate with Dutch kwikzilver, German Low German Quicksülver, German Quecksilber, Danish kviksølv, Norwegian Bokmål kvikksølv, Swedish kvicksilver.

Pronunciation

  • (US) enPR: kwĭk’sĭlvər, IPA(key): /ˈkwɪkˌsɪlvɚ/

Noun

quicksilver (uncountable)

  1. The metal mercury.
  2. (colloquial) An amalgam of mercury and tin applied to the backs of mirrors, quicksilvering.

Quotations

  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:quicksilver.

Synonyms

  • (the metal mercury): mercury, hydrargyrum

Derived terms

Translations

Adjective

quicksilver (not comparable)

  1. Unpredictable, erratic or fickle; mercurial.

Translations

Verb

quicksilver (third-person singular simple present quicksilvers, present participle quicksilvering, simple past and past participle quicksilvered)

  1. To overlay with quicksilver.
  2. To treat with quicksilver.

Further reading

  • David Barthelmy (1997–2021), “Quicksilver”, in Webmineral Mineralogy Database.
  • “quicksilver”, in Mindat.org[2], Hudson Institute of Mineralogy, 2000–2021.
  • quicksilver in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • William Dwight Whitney and Benjamin E[li] Smith, editors (1914), “quicksilver”, in The Century Dictionary: An Encyclopedic Lexicon of the English Language, volume IV (P–Simulant), revised edition, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., OCLC 1078064371.

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