eruct vs spew what difference

what is difference between eruct and spew

English

Etymology

From Latin ēructō.

Verb

eruct (third-person singular simple present eructs, present participle eructing, simple past and past participle eructed)

  1. (formal) To burp or belch.

Derived terms

  • eructate

Translations

Anagrams

  • Crute, Curet, cruet, curet, cuter, recut, truce, uCret


English

Etymology

From Middle English spewen, from Old English spīwan, from Proto-Germanic *spīwaną, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)ptyēw- (to spit, vomit); Germanic cognates include English spit, West Frisian spije, Dutch spuwen, Low German speen, spiien, German speien (to spew, spit, vomit), Swedish spy, Danish spy, Faroese spýggja, Gothic ???????????????????????????? (speiwan). Also cognate, through Indo-European, with Latin spuō (spit, verb), Ancient Greek πτύω (ptúō, spit, vomit), Albanian fyt (throat), Armenian թուք (tʿukʿ), Russian плева́ть (plevátʹ), Persian تف(tuf), Sanskrit ष्ठीवति (ṣṭhī́vati).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spjuː/
  • Rhymes: -uː

Verb

spew (third-person singular simple present spews, present participle spewing, simple past spewed, past participle spewed or spewn)

  1. (transitive) To eject forcibly and in a stream,
    • 2014 December 11, Megan Willett, “The 16 Most Disappointing Places To Visit On Earth”, Business Insider UK:
      But you get to the beach via monorail and you get to the sand and look out to the ocean and all you see is oil tankers and factories spewing smoke on the horizon. It was like some sort of futuristic dystopia.
  2. (intransitive) To be forcibly ejected.
  3. (transitive) To speak or write quickly and voluminously, especially words that are not worth listening to or reading.
  4. (intransitive) To be written or spoken voluminously.
  5. (intransitive, informal) To vomit.
  6. (intransitive) To ejaculate.
    • 17th century, widely attributed to John Wilmot, 2nd Earl of Rochester:
      I rise at eleven, I dine about two, I get drunk before seven, and the next thing I do; I send for my whore, when for fear of a clap, I spend in her hand, and I spew in her lap
  7. (intransitive, leather-working) To develop a white powder or dark crystals on the surface of finished leather, as a result from improper tanning.

Related terms

  • spew alert

Translations

Noun

spew (uncountable)

  1. (slang) Vomit.
    • 2001, Douglas Maddon, The English Department’s Whores (page 247)
      Poor old Sedgwick had been chased around the rugger pitch by a lunatic in a car, and then seen his researcher covered in spew from a drunken student.
  2. (slang) Ejaculate or ejaculation.
  3. Nonsense or lies.
  4. Material that has been ejected in a stream, or the act of spewing.
  5. A white powder or dark crystals that appear on the surface of improperly tanned leather.
  6. Adhesive that is squeezed from a joint under pressure and held across the joint by a fillet, thereby strengthening the joint.

Derived terms

  • Belyando spew
  • bespew

Translations

References

  • spew at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • spew in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • EWPs, PEWs, pews

Middle English

Verb

spew

  1. Alternative form of spewen

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