erudite vs learned what difference

what is difference between erudite and learned

English

Etymology

From Latin ērudītus, participle of ērudiō (educate, train), from e- (out of) + rudis (rude, unskilled). Doublet of erudit.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɛɹ.ʊ.daɪt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɛɹ.(j)u.daɪt/, IPA(key): /ˈɛɹ.(j)ə.daɪt/

Adjective

erudite (comparative more erudite, superlative most erudite)

  1. Learned, scholarly, with emphasis on knowledge gained from books.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:learned

Related terms

Translations

Noun

erudite (plural erudites)

  1. a learned or scholarly person

Italian

Adjective

erudite f pl

  1. feminine plural of erudito

Noun

erudite f pl

  1. feminine plural of erudito

Verb

erudite

  1. inflection of erudire:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
    3. feminine plural past participle
  2. feminine plural past participle of erudirsi

Anagrams

  • deuteri, udirete

Latin

Etymology 1

From ērudītus (educated, accomplished)

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /eː.ruˈdiː.teː/, [eːɾʊˈd̪iːt̪eː]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /e.ruˈdi.te/, [ɛruˈd̪iːt̪ɛ]

Adverb

ērudītē (comparative ērudītius, superlative ērudītissimē)

  1. learnedly, with erudition

Related terms

  • ērudiō
  • ērudītiō
  • ērudītulus
  • ērudītus

Etymology 2

Inflected forms

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /eː.ruˈdiː.te/, [eːɾʊˈd̪iːt̪ɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /e.ruˈdi.te/, [ɛruˈd̪iːt̪ɛ]

Participle

ērudīte

  1. vocative masculine singular of ērudītus

References

  • erudite in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, 1st edition. (Oxford University Press)


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English lerned, lernd, lernyd, equivalent to learn +‎ -ed, which replaced the earlier lered (taught), from Old English (ġe)lǣred, past participle of lǣran (to teach). Learn formerly had the meaning “to teach”, which is now found only in nonstandard speech, as well as its standard meaning of “to learn”.

Alternative forms

  • learnèd, learnéd

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈlɜːnɪd/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈlɝnɪd/

Adjective

learned (comparative more learned, superlative most learned)

  1. Having much learning, knowledgeable, erudite; highly educated.
    Synonyms: brainy, erudite, knowledgeable, scholarly, educated; see also Thesaurus:learned
    Antonyms: ignorant, stupid, thick, uneducated
    • 1854, Charles Edward Pollock, Lake v. Plaxton, 156 Eng. Rep. 412 (Exch.) 414; 10 Ex. 199, 200 (Eng.)
      My learned Brother Cresswell directed the jury to make the calculation []
  2. (law, formal) A courteous description used in various ways to refer to lawyers or judges.
  3. Scholarly, exhibiting scholarship.
Usage notes
  • This adjectival sense of this word is sometimes spelled with a grave accent, learnèd. This is meant to indicate that the second ‘e’ is pronounced as /ɪ/ or /ə/, rather than being silent, as in the verb form. This usage is largely restricted to poetry and other works in which it is important that the adjective’s disyllabicity be made explicit.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old English leornian (to acquire knowledge)

Alternative forms

  • learnt (UK, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand; alternative in Canada; rarely used in American English)

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /lɜːnd/
  • (US) enPR: lûrnd, IPA(key): /lɝnd/

Verb

learned

  1. (Canada, US and dialectal English) simple past tense and past participle of learn

Adjective

learned (comparative more learned, superlative most learned)

  1. Derived from experience; acquired by learning.
    Everyday behavior is an overlay of learned behavior over instinct.
Translations

References

Further reading

  • learned in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • learned in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Darleen, Darlene, Leander, red lane, relaned

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