escape vs flight what difference

what is difference between escape and flight

English

Etymology

From Middle English escapen, from Anglo-Norman and Old Northern French escaper ( = Old French eschaper, modern French échapper), from Vulgar Latin *excappāre, literally “get out of one’s cape, leave a pursuer with just one’s cape,” from Latin ex- (out) + Late Latin cappa (cape, cloak). Cognate with escapade.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈskeɪp/, /əˈskeɪp/, /ɛˈskeɪp/; (proscribed) /ɪkˈskeɪp/, /ɛkˈskeɪp/
  • Rhymes: -eɪp
  • Hyphenation: es‧cape

Verb

escape (third-person singular simple present escapes, present participle escaping, simple past and past participle escaped)

  1. (intransitive) To get free; to free oneself.
  2. (transitive) To avoid (any unpleasant person or thing); to elude, get away from.
  3. (intransitive) To avoid capture; to get away with something, avoid punishment.
  4. (transitive) To elude the observation or notice of; to not be seen or remembered by.
    • c. 1698-1699 (year published) Edmund Ludlow, Memoirs
      They escaped the search of the enemy.
  5. (transitive, computing) To cause (a single character, or all such characters in a string) to be interpreted literally, instead of with any special meaning it would usually have in the same context, often by prefixing with another character.
    • 1998 August, Tim Berners-Lee et al., Uniform Resource Identifiers (URI): Generic Syntax (RFC 2396), page 8:
      If the data for a URI component would conflict with the reserved purpose, then the conflicting data must be escaped before forming the URI.
  6. (computing) To halt a program or command by pressing a key (such as the “Esc” key) or combination of keys.

Usage notes

  • In senses 2. and 3. this is a catenative verb that takes the gerund (-ing). See Appendix:English catenative verbs

Synonyms

  • break loose

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

escape (plural escapes)

  1. The act of leaving a dangerous or unpleasant situation.
    The prisoners made their escape by digging a tunnel.
  2. Leakage or outflow, as of steam or a liquid, or an electric current through defective insulation.
  3. Something that has escaped; an escapee.
  4. A holiday, viewed as time away from the vicissitudes of life.
  5. (computing) escape key
  6. (programming) The text character represented by 27 (decimal) or 1B (hexadecimal).
    You forgot to insert an escape in the datastream.
  7. (snooker) A successful shot from a snooker position.
  8. (manufacturing) A defective product that is allowed to leave a manufacturing facility.
  9. (obsolete) That which escapes attention or restraint; a mistake, oversight, or transgression.
    • I should have been more accurate, corrected all those former escapes.
  10. (obsolete) A sally.
  11. (architecture) An apophyge.

Translations

References

  • escape in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • escape at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • Escape in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • Peaces, espace, peaces

Asturian

Etymology

From escapar.

Noun

escape m (plural escapes)

  1. escape

French

Adjective

escape (plural escapes)

  1. escape

Noun

escape f (plural escapes)

  1. (architecture) escape

Related terms

  • échapper
  • escapade
  • escaper

Galician

Etymology

From escapar.

Noun

escape m (plural escapes)

  1. escape

Verb

escape

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of escapar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of escapar

Further reading

  • “escape” in Dicionario da Real Academia Galega, Royal Galician Academy.

Italian

Etymology

From English escape.

Noun

escape m (invariable)

  1. (computing) the escape key

Portuguese

Etymology

From escapar.

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: es‧ca‧pe
  • Rhymes: -api, -apɨ

Noun

escape m (plural escapes)

  1. escape
  2. (Portugal) Clipping of tubo de escape.

Verb

escape

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of escapar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of escapar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of escapar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of escapar

Further reading

  • “escape” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Spanish

Etymology

From escapar.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /esˈkape/, [esˈka.pe]

Noun

escape m (plural escapes)

  1. escape
  2. leak
    Synonym: fuga
  3. exhaust pipe, tailpipe
    Synonym: tubo de escape

Derived terms

  • a escape
  • carácter de escape
  • válvula de escape
  • velocidad de escape

Related terms

  • escapatoria
  • escapada

Verb

escape

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of escapar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of escapar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of escapar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of escapar.

Further reading

  • “escape” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: flīt, IPA(key): /flaɪt/
  • Rhymes: -aɪt

Etymology 1

From Middle English flight, from Old English flyht (flight), from Proto-Germanic *fluhtiz (flight), derived from *fleuganą (to fly), from Proto-Indo-European *plewk- (to fly), enlargement of *plew- (flow). Analyzable as fly +‎ -t (variant of -th). Cognate with West Frisian flecht (flight), Dutch vlucht (flight), German Flucht (flight) (etymology 2).

Noun

flight (countable and uncountable, plural flights)

  1. The act of flying.
  2. An instance of flying.
  3. (collective) A collective term for doves or swallows.
  4. A trip made by an aircraft, particularly one between two cities or countries, which is often planned or reserved in advance.
  5. A series of stairs between landings.
  6. A group of canal locks with a short distance between them
  7. A floor which is reached by stairs or escalators.
  8. The feathers on an arrow or dart used to help it follow an even path.
  9. A paper airplane. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  10. (cricket) The movement of a spinning ball through the air – concerns its speed, trajectory and drift.
  11. The ballistic trajectory of an arrow or other projectile.
  12. An aerodynamic surface designed to guide such a projectile’s trajectory.
  13. An air force unit.
  14. Several sample glasses of a specific wine varietal or other beverage. The pours are smaller than a full glass and the flight will generally include three to five different samples.
  15. (engineering) The shaped material forming the thread of a screw.

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Adjective

flight (comparative more flight, superlative most flight)

  1. (obsolete) Fast, swift, fleet.

Verb

flight (third-person singular simple present flights, present participle flighting, simple past and past participle flighted)

  1. (cricket, of a spin bowler) To throw the ball in such a way that it has more airtime and more spin than usual.
  2. (sports, by extension, transitive) To throw or kick something so as to send it flying with more loft or airtime than usual.

See also

Appendix:English collective nouns

Etymology 2

From Middle English, from Old English flyht, from Proto-Germanic *fluhtiz, derived from *fleuhaną (to flee). Analyzable as flee +‎ -t (variant of -th). Cognate with Dutch vlucht, German Flucht (etymology 1).

Noun

flight (countable and uncountable, plural flights)

  1. The act of fleeing.
    take flight
    the flight of a refugee
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      But the sight of her eyes was not a thing to forget. John Dodds said they were the een of a deer with the Devil ahint them; and indeed, they would so appal an onlooker that a sudden unreasoning terror came into his heart, while his feet would impel him to flight.

Related terms

  • flee

Translations


Middle English

Etymology

From Old English flyht.

Noun

flight (plural flights)

  1. flight (act of flying)

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