escape vs miss what difference

what is difference between escape and miss

English

Etymology

From Middle English escapen, from Anglo-Norman and Old Northern French escaper ( = Old French eschaper, modern French échapper), from Vulgar Latin *excappāre, literally “get out of one’s cape, leave a pursuer with just one’s cape,” from Latin ex- (out) + Late Latin cappa (cape, cloak). Cognate with escapade.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈskeɪp/, /əˈskeɪp/, /ɛˈskeɪp/; (proscribed) /ɪkˈskeɪp/, /ɛkˈskeɪp/
  • Rhymes: -eɪp
  • Hyphenation: es‧cape

Verb

escape (third-person singular simple present escapes, present participle escaping, simple past and past participle escaped)

  1. (intransitive) To get free; to free oneself.
  2. (transitive) To avoid (any unpleasant person or thing); to elude, get away from.
  3. (intransitive) To avoid capture; to get away with something, avoid punishment.
  4. (transitive) To elude the observation or notice of; to not be seen or remembered by.
    • c. 1698-1699 (year published) Edmund Ludlow, Memoirs
      They escaped the search of the enemy.
  5. (transitive, computing) To cause (a single character, or all such characters in a string) to be interpreted literally, instead of with any special meaning it would usually have in the same context, often by prefixing with another character.
    • 1998 August, Tim Berners-Lee et al., Uniform Resource Identifiers (URI): Generic Syntax (RFC 2396), page 8:
      If the data for a URI component would conflict with the reserved purpose, then the conflicting data must be escaped before forming the URI.
  6. (computing) To halt a program or command by pressing a key (such as the “Esc” key) or combination of keys.

Usage notes

  • In senses 2. and 3. this is a catenative verb that takes the gerund (-ing). See Appendix:English catenative verbs

Synonyms

  • break loose

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

escape (plural escapes)

  1. The act of leaving a dangerous or unpleasant situation.
    The prisoners made their escape by digging a tunnel.
  2. Leakage or outflow, as of steam or a liquid, or an electric current through defective insulation.
  3. Something that has escaped; an escapee.
  4. A holiday, viewed as time away from the vicissitudes of life.
  5. (computing) escape key
  6. (programming) The text character represented by 27 (decimal) or 1B (hexadecimal).
    You forgot to insert an escape in the datastream.
  7. (snooker) A successful shot from a snooker position.
  8. (manufacturing) A defective product that is allowed to leave a manufacturing facility.
  9. (obsolete) That which escapes attention or restraint; a mistake, oversight, or transgression.
    • I should have been more accurate, corrected all those former escapes.
  10. (obsolete) A sally.
  11. (architecture) An apophyge.

Translations

References

  • escape in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • escape at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • Escape in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • Peaces, espace, peaces

Asturian

Etymology

From escapar.

Noun

escape m (plural escapes)

  1. escape

French

Adjective

escape (plural escapes)

  1. escape

Noun

escape f (plural escapes)

  1. (architecture) escape

Related terms

  • échapper
  • escapade
  • escaper

Galician

Etymology

From escapar.

Noun

escape m (plural escapes)

  1. escape

Verb

escape

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of escapar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of escapar

Further reading

  • “escape” in Dicionario da Real Academia Galega, Royal Galician Academy.

Italian

Etymology

From English escape.

Noun

escape m (invariable)

  1. (computing) the escape key

Portuguese

Etymology

From escapar.

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: es‧ca‧pe
  • Rhymes: -api, -apɨ

Noun

escape m (plural escapes)

  1. escape
  2. (Portugal) Clipping of tubo de escape.

Verb

escape

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of escapar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of escapar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of escapar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of escapar

Further reading

  • “escape” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Spanish

Etymology

From escapar.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /esˈkape/, [esˈka.pe]

Noun

escape m (plural escapes)

  1. escape
  2. leak
    Synonym: fuga
  3. exhaust pipe, tailpipe
    Synonym: tubo de escape

Derived terms

  • a escape
  • carácter de escape
  • válvula de escape
  • velocidad de escape

Related terms

  • escapatoria
  • escapada

Verb

escape

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of escapar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of escapar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of escapar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of escapar.

Further reading

  • “escape” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /mɪs/
  • Rhymes: -ɪs

Etymology 1

From Middle English missen, from Old English missan (to miss, escape the notice of a person), Proto-Germanic *missijaną (to miss, go wrong, fail), from Proto-Indo-European *meytH- (to change, exchange, trade). Cognate with West Frisian misse (to miss), Dutch missen (to miss), German missen (to miss), Norwegian Bokmål and Danish miste (to lose), Swedish missa (to miss), Norwegian Nynorsk and Icelandic missa (to lose).

Verb

miss (third-person singular simple present misses, present participle missing, simple past and past participle missed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To fail to hit.
    • 1666, Edmund Waller, “Instructions to a Painter
      Flying bullets now,
      To execute his rage, appear too slow;
      They miss, or sweep but common souls away.
  2. (transitive) To fail to achieve or attain.
  3. (transitive) To avoid; to escape.
  4. (transitive) To become aware of the loss or absence of; to feel the want or need of, sometimes with regret.
    • The boy became volubly friendly and bubbling over with unexpected humour and high spirits. He tried to persuade Cicely to stay away from the ball-room for a fourth dance. Nobody would miss them, he explained.
  5. (transitive) To fail to understand; to have a shortcoming of perception; overlook.
  6. (transitive) To fail to attend.
  7. (transitive) To be late for something (a means of transportation, a deadline, etc.).
  8. (transitive) To be wanting; to lack something that should be present.
  9. (poker, said of a card) To fail to help the hand of a player.
  10. (sports) To fail to score (a goal).
  11. (intransitive, obsolete) To go wrong; to err.
  12. (intransitive, obsolete) To be absent, deficient, or wanting.
Usage notes
  • This is a catenative verb that takes the gerund (-ing). See Appendix:English catenative verbs
Antonyms
  • (to fail to hit): hit, strike, impinge on, run into, collide with
  • (to feel the absence of): have, feature
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

miss (plural misses)

  1. A failure to hit.
  2. A failure to obtain or accomplish.
  3. An act of avoidance (usually used with the verb give)
  4. (computing) The situation where an item is not found in a cache and therefore needs to be explicitly loaded.
Derived terms
  • swing and a miss
Translations

Etymology 2

From mistress.

Alternative forms

  • Miss
  • meess, Meess (archaic, eye dialect)

Noun

miss (countable and uncountable, plural misses)

  1. A title of respect for a young woman (usually unmarried) with or without a name used.
  2. An unmarried woman; a girl.
  3. A kept woman; a mistress.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Evelyn to this entry?)
  4. (card games) In the game of three-card loo, an extra hand, dealt on the table, which may be substituted for the hand dealt to a player.

Coordinate terms

  • (titles) (of a man): Mr (Mister, mister), Sir (sir); (of a woman): Ms (Miz, mizz), Mrs (Mistress, mistress), Miss (miss), Dame (dame), (of a non-binary person): Mx (Mixter); (see also): Dr (Doctor, doctor), Madam (madam, ma’am) (Category: en:Titles)
Derived terms
  • Miss Havishamesque
Related terms
  • missis, missus
  • missy
Translations

Anagrams

  • ISMS, MSIs, SIMS, Sims, isms, sims

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from English miss.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈmis/

Noun

miss f (plural misses)

  1. beauty queen

Dutch

Etymology

From English miss.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɪs/

Noun

miss f (plural missen, diminutive missje n)

  1. A winner of a beauty contest.
    Annelien Coorevits was Miss België in 2007.

    Annelien Coorevits was Miss Belgium in 2007.
  2. A beauty.
  3. A girl with a high self-esteem.
    Dat is nogal een miss, hoor.

    She has some air.

German

Alternative forms

  • miß (superseded)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mɪs/
  • Rhymes: -ɪs

Verb

miss

  1. second-person singular imperative of messen

Ingrian

Pronoun

miss

  1. Chernyavskij’s form of mis

References

  • Vitalij Chernyavskij (2005) Ižoran keel (Ittseopastaja)[2]

Norwegian Nynorsk

Verb

miss

  1. imperative of missa

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *missą, *missijaz, *missō (loss, want), from Proto-Indo-European *meit- (to change, replace). Cognate with Old Norse missir, missa (a loss).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /miss/, [mis]

Noun

miss n

  1. loss; absence

Declension

Related terms

  • missan (verb)

Polish

Etymology

From English Miss.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): //mʲis//

Noun

miss f (indeclinable)

  1. beauty queen

Further reading

  • miss in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • miss in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English miss.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmis/, [ˈmis]
  • Homophone: mis

Noun

miss f (plural misses)

  1. beauty queen

References

  • “miss” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Swedish

Pronunciation

Noun

miss c

  1. A failure to hit.
  2. A mistake.
  3. (rare) A beauty; a winner of a beauty contest.
    Miss Hawaii gick vidare och vann Miss America-tävlingen

    Miss Hawaii went on to win the Miss America contest

Declension

Synonyms

  • (failure to hit): bom
  • (mistake): misstag
  • (beauty): skönhetsmiss

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