escargot vs snail what difference

what is difference between escargot and snail

English

Etymology

Borrowed from French escargot.

Pronunciation

Noun

escargot (countable and uncountable, plural escargots)

  1. (uncountable) A dish, commonly associated with French cuisine, consisting of edible snails.
    • 2007, Melissa de la Cruz, Crazy Hot (page 270)
      J. is dating P. at NYU and modeling on the side. They’re planning to meet us in Paris for spring break so J. can go to some look-sees (and eat some escargot, obv.).
  2. (countable) A snail (often Helix pomatia) used in preparation of that dish.

Translations


French

Etymology

From Occitan escargol, alteration of caragol, metathesis of cagarol, from a cross between Latin conchylium and Ancient Greek κάχλαξ (kákhlax). Doublet of cagouille.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛs.kaʁ.ɡo/

Noun

escargot m (plural escargots)

  1. snail

Synonyms

  • limaçon
  • (Louisiana, Cajun French) calimaçon

Further reading

  • “escargot” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Etymology

From the Middle English snaile, snayle, from the Old English sneġel, from Proto-Germanic *snagilaz. Cognate with Low German Snagel,
Snâel, Snâl (snail), German Schnegel (slug). Compare also Old Norse snigill, from Proto-Germanic *snigilaz.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: snāl
  • IPA(key): /sneɪl/, [sn̥eɪ̯ɫ]
  • Rhymes: -eɪl

Noun

snail (plural snails)

  1. Any of very many animals (either hermaphroditic or nonhermaphroditic), of the class Gastropoda, having a coiled shell.
  2. (informal, by extension) A slow person; a sluggard.
  3. (engineering) A spiral cam, or a flat piece of metal of spirally curved outline, used for giving motion to, or changing the position of, another part, as the hammer tail of a striking clock.
  4. (military, historical) A tortoise or testudo; a movable roof or shed to protect besiegers.
  5. The pod of the snail clover.
  6. (rail transport) A locomotive with a prime mover but no traction motors, used to provide extra electrical power to another locomotive.

Synonyms

  • dodman, hodmandod (East Anglia, dialectal)

Derived terms

  • snail trefoil (Medicago scutellata)
  • snail mail
  • snail’s pace

Translations

See also

  • heliciculture
  • slug

Verb

snail (third-person singular simple present snails, present participle snailing, simple past and past participle snailed)

  1. To move or travel very slowly.

Anagrams

  • Lains, Lians, Nilas, Sinla, anils, lains, nails, nilas, salin, slain

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