esophagus vs gorge what difference

what is difference between esophagus and gorge

English

Noun

esophagus (plural esophagi)

  1. (American spelling) Alternative spelling of oesophagus

Derived terms

  • Barrett’s esophagus


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: gôj, IPA(key): /ɡɔːdʒ/
  • (General American) enPR: gôrj, IPA(key): /ɡɔɹd͡ʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)dʒ

Etymology 1

From Middle English gorge (esophagus, gullet; throat; bird’s crop; food in a hawk’s crop; food or drink that has been eaten), a borrowing from Old French gorge (throat) (modern French gorge (throat; breast)), from Vulgar Latin *gorga, *gurga, from Latin gurges (eddy, whirlpool; gulf; sea), possibly from Proto-Indo-European *gʷerh₃- (to devour, swallow; to eat). The English word is cognate with Galician gorxa (throat), Italian gorga, gorgia (gorge, ravine; (obsolete) throat), Occitan gorga, gorja, Portuguese gorja (gullet, throat; gorge), Spanish gorja (gullet, throat; gorge).

Noun

gorge (plural gorges)

  1. (archaic) The front aspect of the neck; the outside of the throat.
  2. (archaic, literary) The inside of the throat; the esophagus, the gullet; (falconry, specifically) the crop or gizzard of a hawk.
  3. Food that has been taken into the gullet or the stomach, particularly if it is regurgitated or vomited out.
  4. (US) A choking or filling of a channel or passage by an obstruction; the obstruction itself.
  5. (architecture) A concave moulding; a cavetto.
  6. (architecture, fortification) The rearward side of an outwork, a bastion, or a fort, often open, or not protected against artillery.
  7. (fishing) A primitive device used instead of a hook to catch fish, consisting of an object that is easy to swallow but difficult to eject or loosen, such as a piece of bone or stone pointed at each end and attached in the middle to a line.
  8. (geography) A deep, narrow passage with steep, rocky sides, particularly one with a stream running through it; a ravine.
    Synonym: canyon
  9. (mechanical engineering) The groove of a pulley.
Usage notes
  • (food taken into the gullet or stomach): A person’s gorge is said to rise (that is, they feel as if they are about to vomit) if they feel irritated or nauseated.
Derived terms
Related terms
  • gorget
  • gorgeted
Translations

Etymology 2

The verb is derived from Middle English gorgen (to eat greedily; to gorge), a borrowing from Old French gorger, gorgier (modern French gorger (to eat greedily; to gorge)), from gorge (throat); see further at etymology 1.

The noun is derived from the verb.

Verb

gorge (third-person singular simple present gorges, present participle gorging, simple past and past participle gorged)

  1. (intransitive, reflexive) To stuff the gorge or gullet with food; to eat greedily and in large quantities. [+ on (object)]
  2. (transitive) To swallow, especially with greediness, or in large mouthfuls or quantities.
  3. (transitive) To fill up to the throat; to glut, to satiate.
    Synonyms: sate, stuff
  4. (transitive) To fill up (an organ, a vein, etc.); to block up or obstruct; (US, specifically) of ice: to choke or fill a channel or passage, causing an obstruction.
    Synonym: engorge
Conjugation
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

gorge (plural gorges)

  1. An act of gorging.
Translations

Etymology 3

Clipping of gorge(ous); originally British slang.

Adjective

gorge (comparative more gorge, superlative most gorge)

  1. (slang) Gorgeous.

Notes

References

Further reading

  • canyon on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • gorge (fortification) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • gorge (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • gorge at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Grego, Rogge, grego

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɔʁʒ/

Etymology 1

From Old French gorge, from Late Latin gurga, related to Latin gurges (eddy, whirlpool; gulf; sea).

Noun

gorge f (plural gorges)

  1. throat
  2. breast
  3. gorge
Derived terms
Related terms
  • ingurgiter
  • régurgiter
Descendants
  • Catalan: gorja
  • Italian: gorgia
  • Portuguese: gorja
  • Spanish: gorja

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

gorge

  1. first-person singular present indicative of gorger
  2. third-person singular present indicative of gorger
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of gorger
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of gorger
  5. second-person singular imperative of gorger

Further reading

  • “gorge” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɔr.d͡ʒe/
  • Rhymes: -ɔrdʒe

Noun

gorge f

  1. plural of gorgia

Anagrams

  • gergo, reggo, rogge

Middle French

Noun

gorge f (plural gorges)

  1. (anatomy) throat

Norman

Etymology

From Old French gorge, from Late Latin gurga, related to Latin gurges (eddy, whirlpool; gulf; sea).

Pronunciation

Noun

gorge f (plural gorges)

  1. (Jersey, anatomy) throat

Derived terms

  • bigorgi (to slit a throat)

Old French

Etymology

From Late Latin gurga, related to Latin gurges (eddy, whirlpool; gulf; sea).

Noun

gorge f (oblique plural gorges, nominative singular gorge, nominative plural gorges)

  1. throat

Descendants

  • French: gorge
    • Catalan: gorja
    • Italian: gorgia
    • Portuguese: gorja
    • Spanish: gorja
  • Galician: gorxa

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