essayer vs trier what difference

what is difference between essayer and trier

English

Etymology

From essay +‎ -er.

Noun

essayer (plural essayers)

  1. (obsolete) One who performs an essay; an experimenter.

French

Etymology

From Middle French essayer, essaier, from Old French essaiier, essayer, essaier, from essay, essai (attempt; assay; experiment) + -er (infinitive-forming suffix), from Late Latin exagium (weight; weighing, testing on the balance), from Latin exigere + -ium, from ex- + agere, from Proto-Italic *agō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂éǵeti.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /e.sɛ.je/, /e.se.je/

Verb

essayer

  1. (transitive) to test, to try on
  2. (with “de”) to try, to attempt
    J’ai essayé d’apprendre le piano.

Conjugation

This is a regular -er verb as far as pronunciation is concerned, but as with other verbs in -ayer (such as payer and essayer, the <y> of its stem may optionally be written as <i> when it precedes a silent <e> (compare verbs in -eyer, which never have this spelling change, and verbs in -oyer and -uyer, which always have it; verbs in -ayer belong to either group, according to the writer’s preference).

Related terms

Further reading

  • “essayer” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Paronyms

  • essuyer

Anagrams

  • ressaye, ressayé

Middle French

Verb

essayer

  1. (transitive) to test
  2. (with “de”) to try

Conjugation

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

essayer n

  1. indefinite singular of essay

Synonyms

  • essay


English

Etymology

try +‎ -er

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɹaɪə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -aɪə(ɹ)

Noun

trier (plural triers)

  1. One who tries; one who makes experiments or examines anything by a test or standard.
    • 1670, Robert Boyle, Of a Discovery of the Admirable Rarefaction of Air
      ingenious trier
  2. An instrument used for sampling something.
    • 2009, Stephanie Clark, Michael Costello, Floyd Bodyfelt, The Sensory Evaluation of Dairy Products (page 145)
      The judge should grasp the butter trier firmly in hand and insert the sampling device as near as possible to the center of the butter sample.
  3. One who tries judicially.
  4. (law) A person appointed by law to try challenges of jurors; a trior.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Burrill to this entry?)
  5. (obsolete) That which tries or approves; a test.

Derived terms

  • trier of fact
  • cheese trier

Anagrams

  • Riter, Terri

French

Etymology

From Middle French trier, from Old French trier (to choose, pick out or separate from others, sift, cull), from Gallo-Romance *triare (to pick out), a variant of Late Latin trītō, trītāre, from Latin trītus, the past participle of terō. The word sense originates from granum terere, to beat the corn from the chaff, or trier le grain in modern French, hence the meaning. Italian tritare keeps both senses of the word – to grind and to sort – confirming a common Romance origin. For loss of medial “t” see abbaye.

Old French tirer (to pull out, snatch), is a false cognate of Germanic origin.

Related to Occitan triar (to pick out, choose from among others), Catalan triar (to pick, choose).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʁi.je/

Verb

trier

  1. to sort, to sort out
    Trier le tas de lettres.

    Sort (out) the pile of letters.
  2. to grade; to calibrate

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • trier sur le volet (to handpick, to carefully select)
  • triage

Further reading

  • “trier” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • tirer

Old French

Etymology

Disputed; see English try.

Verb

trier

  1. to choose; to select
  2. to sort
  3. to find
  4. to verify; to make sure of
  5. (law) to try (in court)
  6. to pull

Conjugation

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Descendants

  • English: try
  • French: trier

References

  • trier on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub
  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (trier)

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial