essential vs necessary what difference

what is difference between essential and necessary

English

Alternative forms

  • essentiall (obsolete)

Etymology

From Late Latin essentiālis, from Latin essentia (being, essence).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈsɛn.ʃəl/, [əˈsɛn.tʃəl]
  • Hyphenation: es‧sen‧tial

Adjective

essential (comparative more essential, superlative most essential)

  1. Necessary.
    Synonyms: indispensable; see also Thesaurus:requisite
    Antonyms: accidental, accessorial, incidental, unnecessary, unneeded
  2. Very important; of high importance.
    Synonyms: crucial; see also Thesaurus:important
    Antonyms: unimportant; see also Thesaurus:insignificant
  3. (biology) Necessary for survival but not synthesized by the organism, thus needing to be ingested.
  4. Being in the basic form; showing its essence.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:intrinsic, Thesaurus:bare-bones
    Antonyms: adscititious; see also Thesaurus:extrinsic
  5. Really existing; existent.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:existent
    Antonyms: see Thesaurus:inexistent
  6. (geometry) Such that each complementary region is irreducible, the boundary of each complementary region is incompressible by disks and monogons in the complementary region, and no leaf is a sphere or a torus bounding a solid torus in the manifold.
    (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  7. (medicine) Idiopathic.
  8. Having the nature of essence; not physical.

Antonyms

  • inessential, unessential, non-essential, nonessential

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

essential (plural essentials)

  1. A necessary ingredient.
  2. A fundamental ingredient.
    (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Related terms

  • essence

Translations

Further reading

  • essential on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • siletanes


English

Etymology

From Middle English necessarye, from Old French necessaire, from Latin necessārius (unavoidable, inevitable, required), variant of necesse (unavoidable, inevitable), probably from ne or non cessum, from the perfect passive participle of cēdō (yield; avoid, withdraw); see cede.

Older use as a noun in reference to an outhouse or lavatory under the influence of English and Latin necessārium, a medieval term for the place for monks’ “unavoidable” business, usually located behind or attached to monastic dormitories.

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈnɛsəˌsɛɹi/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈnɛsəsɹɪ/
  • (nonstandard) IPA(key): /ˈnɛsəɹi/

Adjective

necessary (comparative necessarier or more necessary, superlative necessariest or most necessary)

  1. Required, essential, whether logically inescapable or needed in order to achieve a desired result or avoid some penalty.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:requisite
    Antonym: unnecessary
    • c. 1605, William Shakespeare & al., The Life of Tymon of Athens, Act III, Scene vi, ll. 1258-60:
      1.Sen. …The faults Bloody:
      ‘Tis necessary he should dye:
      Nothing imboldens sinne so much, as Mercy.
  2. Unavoidable, inevitable.
    Synonyms: inevitable, natural
    Antonyms: evitable, incidental, impossible
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, The Tragedie of Iulius Cæsar, Act II, Scene ii, ll. 1020-25:
      Cæs. Cowards dye many times before their deaths,
      The valiant neuer taste of death but once:
      Of all the Wonders that I yet haue heard,
      It seemes to me most strange that men should feare,
      Seeing that death, a necessary end
      Will come, when it will come.
  3. (obsolete) Determined, involuntary: acting from compulsion rather than free will.
    • 1871, Richard Holt Hutton, Essays, Vol. I, p. 53:
      But that a necessary being should give birth to a being with any amount, however limited, of moral freedom, is infinitely less conceivable than that parents of the insect or fish type should give birth to a perfect mammal.

Derived terms

  • necessarily
  • necessary condition

Related terms

Translations

Noun

necessary (plural necessaries)

  1. (Britain, archaic euphemistic, usually with the definite article) A place to do the “necessary” business of urination and defecation: an outhouse or lavatory.

Synonyms

  • See Thesaurus:bathroom

Related terms

  • necessary house; necessary place, necessary stool, necessary vault (obsolete)

References

  • necessary in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • necessary in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

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