essential vs necessity what difference

what is difference between essential and necessity

English

Alternative forms

  • essentiall (obsolete)

Etymology

From Late Latin essentiālis, from Latin essentia (being, essence).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪˈsɛn.ʃəl/, [əˈsɛn.tʃəl]
  • Hyphenation: es‧sen‧tial

Adjective

essential (comparative more essential, superlative most essential)

  1. Necessary.
    Synonyms: indispensable; see also Thesaurus:requisite
    Antonyms: accidental, accessorial, incidental, unnecessary, unneeded
  2. Very important; of high importance.
    Synonyms: crucial; see also Thesaurus:important
    Antonyms: unimportant; see also Thesaurus:insignificant
  3. (biology) Necessary for survival but not synthesized by the organism, thus needing to be ingested.
  4. Being in the basic form; showing its essence.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:intrinsic, Thesaurus:bare-bones
    Antonyms: adscititious; see also Thesaurus:extrinsic
  5. Really existing; existent.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:existent
    Antonyms: see Thesaurus:inexistent
  6. (geometry) Such that each complementary region is irreducible, the boundary of each complementary region is incompressible by disks and monogons in the complementary region, and no leaf is a sphere or a torus bounding a solid torus in the manifold.
    (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  7. (medicine) Idiopathic.
  8. Having the nature of essence; not physical.

Antonyms

  • inessential, unessential, non-essential, nonessential

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

essential (plural essentials)

  1. A necessary ingredient.
  2. A fundamental ingredient.
    (Can we add an example for this sense?)

Related terms

  • essence

Translations

Further reading

  • essential on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • siletanes


English

Etymology

From Middle English necessite, from Old French necessite, from Latin necessitās (unavoidableness, compulsion, exigency, necessity), from necesse (unavoidable, inevitable); see necessary.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nɪˈsɛsəti/

Noun

necessity (countable and uncountable, plural necessities)

  1. The quality or state of being necessary, unavoidable, or absolutely requisite.
  2. The condition of being needy; desperate need; lack.
    • 1863, Richard Sibbes, The Successful Seeker, in The Complete Works of Richard Sibbes, D.D., Volume VI, James Nichol, page 125,
      For it is in vain for a man to think to seek God in his necessity and exigence, if he seek not God in his ordinances, and do not joy in them.
  3. Something necessary; a requisite; something indispensable.
    • 20th century, Tenzin Gyatso (attributed)
      Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them humanity cannot survive.
  4. Something which makes an act or an event unavoidable; an irresistible force; overruling power.
    • 1804, Wordsworth, The Small Celandine
      I stopped, and said with inly muttered voice,
      ‘It doth not love the shower, nor seek the cold:
      This neither is its courage nor its choice,
      But its necessity in being old.
  5. The negation of freedom in voluntary action; the subjection of all phenomena, whether material or spiritual, to inevitable causation; necessitarianism. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  6. (law) Greater utilitarian good; used in justification of a criminal act.
  7. (law, in the plural) Indispensable requirements (of life).

Synonyms

  • (state of being necessary): inevitability, certainty

Antonyms

  • (state of being necessary): impossibility, contingency
  • (something indispensable): luxury

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Further reading

  • necessity in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • necessity in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • cysteines

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