esteem vs respect what difference

what is difference between esteem and respect

English

Alternative forms

  • æsteem (archaic)
  • esteeme (obsolete)

Etymology

First at end of 16th century; borrowed from Middle French estimer, from Latin aestimō (to value, rate, weigh, estimate); see estimate and aim, an older word, partly a doublet of esteem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪsˈtiːm/, /əsˈtiːm/
  • Rhymes: -iːm

Noun

esteem (usually uncountable, plural esteems)

  1. Favourable regard.

Derived terms

  • self-esteem

Translations

Verb

esteem (third-person singular simple present esteems, present participle esteeming, simple past and past participle esteemed)

  1. To set a high value on; to regard with respect or reverence.
    • Will he esteem thy riches?
    • You talk kindlier: we esteem you for it.
  2. To regard something as valuable; to prize.
  3. To look upon something in a particular way.
    • Then he forsook God, which made him, and lightly esteemed the Rock of his salvation.
    • 1535, Edmund Bonner, De vera obedientia by Stephen Gardiner (Preface)
      Thou shouldest (gentle reader) esteem his censure and authority to be of the more weighty credence.
    • Famous men, whose scientific attainments were esteemed hardly less than supernatural.
    • 1843, Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, book 3, ch. V, The English
      And greatly do I respect the solid character, — a blockhead, thou wilt say; yes, but a well-conditioned blockhead, and the best-conditioned, — who esteems all ‘Customs once solemnly acknowledged’ to be ultimate, divine, and the rule for a man to walk by, nothing doubting, not inquiring farther.
  4. (obsolete) To judge; to estimate; to appraise

Synonyms

  • (to regard with respect): respect, revere
  • (to regard as valuable): cherish

Antonyms

  • (to regard with respect): contemn, despise
  • (to regard as valuable): scorn, slight

Translations

References

  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989), “esteem”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN.

Further reading

  • esteem in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • esteem in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Mestee, mestee


English

Etymology

From Middle English respect, from Old French respect, also respit (respect, regard, consideration), from Latin respectus (a looking at, regard, respect), perfect passive participle of respiciō (look at, look back upon, respect), from re- (back) + speciō (to see). Doublet of respite.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɹɪˈspɛkt/
  • Rhymes: -ɛkt
  • Hyphenation: re‧spect

Noun

respect (countable and uncountable, plural respects)

  1. (uncountable) an attitude of consideration or high regard
    Synonyms: deference, esteem, consideration, regard, fealty, reverence, aught
  2. (uncountable) good opinion, honor, or admiration
    Synonyms: admiration, esteem, reverence, regard, recognition, veneration, honor
  3. (uncountable, always plural) Polite greetings, often offered as condolences after a death.
  4. (countable) a particular aspect, feature or detail of something
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, Sonnet 36:
      In our two loves there is but one respect
    Synonyms: aspect, dimension, face, facet, side
  5. Good will; favor
    • 1611, King James Version, Exodus 2:25:
      And God looked upon the children of Israel, and God had respect unto them.

Usage notes

  • Adjectives often applied to “respect”: great, high, utmost, absolute

Antonyms

Derived terms

Related terms

  • respective

Translations

Verb

respect (third-person singular simple present respects, present participle respecting, simple past and past participle respected)

  1. To have respect for.
  2. To have regard for something, to observe a custom, practice, rule or right.
  3. To abide by an agreement.
  4. To take notice of; to regard as worthy of special consideration; to heed.
  5. (transitive, dated except in “respecting”) To relate to; to be concerned with.
    • 1674, John Owen, Pneumatologia:
      Whatever they are else, they are always chastisements; and correction respects faults.
    • 1806, James Lee, An Introduction to Botany:
      Glandulation respects the secretory vessels, which are either glandules, follicles, or utricles.
  6. (obsolete) To regard; to consider; to deem.
  7. (obsolete) To look toward; to face.

Derived terms

Synonyms

  • (to have respect for): esteem, honor, revere, venerate
  • (to regard as worthy of special consideration): esteem, value
  • (to abide by an agreement): honor

Antonyms

  • (to have respect for): contemn, despect (verb) (archaic), despise, dis, diss, disrespect (verb)
  • (to regard as worthy of special consideration): belittle, ignore, neglect, slight

Translations

Interjection

respect

  1. (Jamaican) hello, hi

References

  • respect at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • respect in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • respect in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • respect in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Sceptre, recepts, scepter, sceptre, specter, spectre

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French respect, from Old French respect, from Latin respectus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rɛsˈpɛkt/, /rəˈspɛkt/
  • Hyphenation: res‧pect
  • Rhymes: -ɛkt

Noun

respect n (uncountable)

  1. respect
    Synonym: eerbied

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: respek
  • Negerhollands: respekt, respect
  • Indonesian: respek
  • Papiamentu: reespek (dated)

French

Etymology

From Latin respectus. Doublet of répit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁɛs.pɛ/

Noun

respect m (plural respects)

  1. respect

Derived terms

  • avec tout le respect que je vous dois
  • respecter
  • respectueux
  • sauf votre respect
  • tenir en respect

Further reading

  • “respect” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • spectre

Jamaican Creole

Alternative forms

  • respeck

Etymology

From English respect.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹɪsˌspɛk/
  • Hyphenation: res‧pect

Interjection

respect

  1. greetings, hello, hi
    • (The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought:)
  2. bye, goodbye
    • (The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought:)

See also

  • guidance
  • manners
  • protection

Noun

respect

  1. respect
    Synonym: ratings

Derived terms

  • respect due

Verb

respect

  1. respect
    Synonym: rate

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French respect, Latin respectus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /resˈpekt/

Noun

respect n (uncountable)

  1. respect, consideration, deference, esteem, regard
    Synonym: stimă

Declension

Related terms

Further reading

  • respect in DEX online – Dicționare ale limbii române (Dictionaries of the Romanian language)

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