estimate vs gauge what difference

what is difference between estimate and gauge

English

Alternative forms

  • æstimate (archaic)

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin aestimatus, past participle of aestimō, older form aestumo (to value, rate, esteem); from Old Latin *ais-temos (one who cuts copper), meaning one in the Roman Republic who mints money. See also the doublet esteem, as well as aim.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛstɨmɨt/ (noun)
  • IPA(key): /ˈɛstɨˌmeɪ̪t/ (verb)

Noun

estimate (plural estimates)

  1. A rough calculation or assessment of the value, size, or cost of something.
  2. (construction and business) A document (or verbal notification) specifying how much a job is likely to cost.
  3. An upper limitation on some positive quantity.

Synonyms

  • estimation
  • appraisal

Derived terms

  • ballpark estimate

Translations

Verb

estimate (third-person singular simple present estimates, present participle estimating, simple past and past participle estimated)

  1. To calculate roughly, often from imperfect data.
  2. To judge and form an opinion of the value of, from imperfect data.

Synonyms

  • appraise
  • assessment

Derived terms

  • estimable
  • underestimate
  • overestimate
  • estimation

Translations

Further reading

  • estimate in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “estimate”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  • estimate in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • etatisme, meatiest, seat time, tea-times, teatimes, étatisme

Italian

Verb

estimate

  1. inflection of estimare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
  2. feminine plural of estimato

Anagrams

  • mestiate, metatesi


English

Alternative forms

  • gage

Etymology

From Middle English gauge, gaugen, from Anglo-Norman, Old Northern French gauger (compare Modern French jauger from Old French jaugier), from gauge (gauging rod), from Frankish *galga (measuring rod, pole), from Proto-Germanic *galgô (pole, stake, cross), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰAlgʰ-, *ǵʰAlg- (perch, long switch). Cognate with Old High German galgo, Old Frisian galga, Old English ġealga (cross-beam, gallows), Old Norse galgi (cross-beam, gallows), Old Norse gelgja (pole, perch). See gallow.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: gāj, IPA(key): /ˈɡeɪdʒ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪdʒ
  • Homophone: gage

Noun

gauge (countable and uncountable, plural gauges)

  1. A measure; a standard of measure; an instrument to determine dimensions, distance, or capacity; a standard
    • 1780, Edmund Burke, speech at The Guildhall, in Bristol
      the gauge and dimensions of misery, depression, and contempt
  2. An act of measuring.
  3. An estimate.
  4. Any instrument for ascertaining or regulating the level, state, dimensions or forms of things
  5. A thickness of sheet metal or wire designated by any of several numbering schemes.
  6. (rail transport) The distance between the rails of a railway.
  7. (mathematics, mathematical analysis) A semi-norm; a function that assigns a non-negative size to all vectors in a vector space.
  8. (knitting) The number of stitches per inch, centimetre, or other unit of distance.
  9. (nautical) Relative positions of two or more vessels with reference to the wind.
    A vessel has the weather gauge of another when on the windward side of it, and the lee gauge when on the lee side of it.
  10. (nautical) The depth to which a vessel sinks in the water.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Totten to this entry?)
  11. (plastering) The quantity of plaster of Paris used with common plaster to make it set more quickly.
  12. That part of a shingle, slate, or tile, which is exposed to the weather, when laid; also, one course of such shingles, slates, or tiles.
  13. (firearms) A unit of measurement which describes how many spheres of bore diameter of a shotgun can be had from one pound of lead; 12 gauge is roughly equivalent to .75 caliber.
  14. (US, slang, by extension) A shotgun (synecdoche for 12 gauge shotgun, the most common chambering for combat and hunting shotguns).
  15. A tunnel-like ear piercing consisting of a hollow ring embedded in the lobe.
    • 2013, Destiny Patterson, Samantha Beckworth, Jennifer Proctor, Arose (page 150)
      Jenni didn’t really look as though she fit in with the rest of the girls here, she had a nose piercing and angel bites, her long curly dark brown hair with red highlights was pulled back exposing gauges and many other ear piercings and a tattoo []
  16. (slang, uncountable) Cannabis.
    • 1971, Black Creation (volumes 3-6, page 53)
      [] smoking gauge was a new phenomenon to Himes: “When I looked up after turning the corner, all the grimy facades seemed to be a blaze of bright colors, gold, scarlet, blue, green, like an array of peacocks. []
    • 2000, Cynthia Palmer, ‎Michael Horowitz, Sisters of the Extreme
      When we settled, he said, “You’ve been smoking gauge, haven’t you?”

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

gauge (third-person singular simple present gauges, present participle gauging, simple past and past participle gauged)

  1. (transitive) To measure or determine with a gauge; to measure the capacity of.
  2. (transitive) To estimate.
  3. (transitive) To appraise the character or ability of; to judge of.
  4. (textile, transitive) To draw into equidistant gathers by running a thread through it.
  5. (transitive) To mix (a quantity of ordinary plaster) with a quantity of plaster of Paris.
  6. (transitive) To chip, hew or polish (stones, bricks, etc) to a standard size and/or shape.

Translations

See also

  • gage
  • gouge

References

  • gauge in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • gage

Etymology

From Old Northern French gauge, from Frankish *galga, from Proto-Germanic *galgô. Doublet of galwes.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡau̯dʒ(ə)/, /ˈɡaːdʒ(ə)/

Noun

gauge

  1. A customary measurement or scale.

Related terms

  • gaugen
  • gauger

Descendants

  • English: gauge
  • Scots: gauge

References

  • “gauǧe, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-22.

Old French

Noun

gauge f (oblique plural gauges, nominative singular gauge, nominative plural gauges)

  1. Alternative form of jauge

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial