estimate vs judge what difference

what is difference between estimate and judge

English

Alternative forms

  • æstimate (archaic)

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin aestimatus, past participle of aestimō, older form aestumo (to value, rate, esteem); from Old Latin *ais-temos (one who cuts copper), meaning one in the Roman Republic who mints money. See also the doublet esteem, as well as aim.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛstɨmɨt/ (noun)
  • IPA(key): /ˈɛstɨˌmeɪ̪t/ (verb)

Noun

estimate (plural estimates)

  1. A rough calculation or assessment of the value, size, or cost of something.
  2. (construction and business) A document (or verbal notification) specifying how much a job is likely to cost.
  3. An upper limitation on some positive quantity.

Synonyms

  • estimation
  • appraisal

Derived terms

  • ballpark estimate

Translations

Verb

estimate (third-person singular simple present estimates, present participle estimating, simple past and past participle estimated)

  1. To calculate roughly, often from imperfect data.
  2. To judge and form an opinion of the value of, from imperfect data.

Synonyms

  • appraise
  • assessment

Derived terms

  • estimable
  • underestimate
  • overestimate
  • estimation

Translations

Further reading

  • estimate in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “estimate”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  • estimate in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • etatisme, meatiest, seat time, tea-times, teatimes, étatisme

Italian

Verb

estimate

  1. inflection of estimare:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative
  2. feminine plural of estimato

Anagrams

  • mestiate, metatesi


English

Alternative forms

  • judg (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • enPR: jŭj, IPA(key): /d͡ʒʌd͡ʒ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌdʒ

Etymology 1

From Middle English juge, jugge, borrowed from Old French juge, from Latin iūdex. Displaced native Old English dēma.

Noun

judge (plural judges)

  1. A public official whose duty it is to administer the law, especially by presiding over trials and rendering judgments; a justice.
    • 1612, Francis Bacon, Of Judicature
      The parts of a judge in hearing are four: to direct the evidence; to moderate length, repetition, or impertinency of speech; to recapitulate, select, and collate the material points of that which hath been said; and to give the rule or sentence.
  2. A person who decides the fate of someone or something that has been called into question.
  3. A person officiating at a sports event or similar.
  4. A person who evaluates something or forms an opinion.

Synonyms

  • (one who judges in an official capacity): magistrate (now usually of low rank); justice (now usually of high rank); justiciar, justiciary (historic, of high rank); Chief Justice, Chief Justiciar, Capital Justiciary, Chief Justiciary, justiciar, justiciary (of the highest rank); justicer (obsolete); sheriff, bailiff, reeve (historic or obsolete); doomsman (obsolete)
  • (one who judges generally): deemer, deemster

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Assamese: জজ (zoz)
  • Bengali: জজ (jôj)
  • → Hindustani:
    Hindi: जज (jaj)
    Urdu: جج(jaj)
  • Oriya: ଜଜ୍ (jôj)
  • Tamil: ஜட்ஜி (jaṭji)
  • Telugu: జడ్జ (jaḍja)

Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English jugen, borrowed from Anglo-Norman juger, from Old French jugier, from Latin iūdicāre.

Mostly displaced native deem.

Verb

judge (third-person singular simple present judges, present participle judging, simple past and past participle judged)

  1. (transitive) To sit in judgment on; to pass sentence on.
  2. (intransitive) To sit in judgment, to act as judge.
  3. (transitive) To form an opinion on.
    • c. 1921, Michael Collins, after the Anglo-Irish Treaty:
      Let us be judged for what we attempted rather than what we achieved.
  4. (intransitive) To arbitrate; to pass opinion on something, especially to settle a dispute etc.
  5. (transitive) To have as an opinion; to consider, suppose.
  6. (intransitive) To form an opinion; to infer.
    • THE sun was up so high when I waked that I judged it was after eight o’clock.
  7. (transitive, intransitive) To criticize or label another person or thing.
    • 1993, Aerosmith, Livin’ on the Edge
      There’s something wrong with the world today; the light bulb’s getting dim.
      There’s meltdown in the sky.
      If you can judge a wise man by the color of his skin,
      Mister, you’re a better man than I
Conjugation

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:deem

Derived terms

  • forejudge
  • misjudge
  • unjudge
  • you can’t judge a book by its cover

Translations

See also

  • abjudge
  • abjudicate
  • adjudicate
  • judgment
  • judicator
  • judicial
  • judiciary
  • prejudice
  • magistrate

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