esurient vs famished what difference

what is difference between esurient and famished

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin ēsurient, ēsurientem, from ēsuriēns (hungering), present participle of ēsuriō (to be hungry, to hunger for something), a desiderative verb from edō (to eat) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁édti (to eat)) + -turiō (suffix indicating a desire for an action).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪˈsjʊə.ɹɪ.ənt/, /ɪˈʃʊə.ɹi.ənt/, /iː-/, /ɛ-/, /ə-/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɪˈsʊ.ɹi.ənt/, /ə-/, /-ˈzʊ-/
  • Hyphenation: esu‧ri‧ent

Adjective

esurient (comparative more esurient, superlative most esurient)

  1. (formal, now often humorous) Very greedy or hungry; ravenous; (figuratively) avid, eager. [from late 17th c.]
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:voracious

Derived terms

  • esurience
  • esuriently

Related terms

  • esurine

Translations

Noun

esurient (plural esurients)

  1. One who is greedy or hungry.

Translations

See also

  • esculent

References

Anagrams

  • Turinese, neurites, retinues, reunites, unitrees, uterines

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /eːˈsu.ri.ent/, [eːˈs̠ʊɾiɛn̪t̪]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /eˈsu.ri.ent/, [ɛˈs̬uːriɛn̪t̪]

Verb

ēsurient

  1. third-person plural future active indicative of ēsuriō


English

Etymology

Inflected forms.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfæmɪʃt/

Verb

famished

  1. simple past tense and past participle of famish

Adjective

famished (comparative more famished, superlative most famished)

  1. Extremely hungry.

Translations


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