even vs flush what difference

what is difference between even and flush

English

Alternative forms

  • eben (etymology 1: adverb, adjective)
  • e’en (etymology 1: adverb, etymology 2: noun; contraction, poetic, archaic)

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈiːvən/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈivən/, /ˈivn̩/
  • Rhymes: -iːvən
  • Hyphenation: e‧ven

Etymology 1

From Middle English even, from Old English efen, efn, emn (even, equal, like, level, just, impartial, true), from Proto-West Germanic *ebn, from Proto-Germanic *ebnaz (flat, level, even; equal, straight), from Proto-Indo-European *(h₁)em-no- (equal, straight; flat, level, even).

Cognate with West Frisian even (even), Low German even (even), Dutch even (even, equal, same), effen, German eben (even, flat, level), Danish jævn (even, flat, smooth), Swedish jämn (even, level, smooth), Icelandic jafn, jamn (even, equal), Old Cornish eun (equal, right) (attested in Vocabularium Cornicum eun-hinsic (iustus, i. e., just)), Old Breton eun (equal, right) (attested in Eutychius Glossary eunt (aequus, i. e., equal)), Middle Breton effn, Breton eeun, Sanskrit अम्नस् (amnás, (adverb) just, just now; at once).

The verb descends from Middle English evenen, from Old English efnan; the adverb from Middle English evene, from Old English efne.

The traditional proposal connecting the Germanic adjective with the root Proto-Indo-European *h₂eym-, (Latin imāgō (picture, image, likeness, copy), Latin aemulus (competitor, rival), Sanskrit यमस् (yamás, pair, twin)) is problematic from a phonological point of view.

Adjective

even (comparative more even, superlative most even)

  1. Flat and level.
  2. Without great variation.
  3. Equal in proportion, quantity, size, etc.
  4. (not comparable, of an integer) Divisible by two.
  5. (of a number) Convenient for rounding other numbers to; for example, ending in a zero.
    • 1989, Jerry Sterner, Other People’s Money, Act I:
      Coles. How many shares have you bought, Mr. Garfinkle?
      Garfinkle. One hundred and ninety-six thousand. []
      Jorgenson. [] How’d you figure out to buy such an odd amount? Why not two hundred thousand — nice even number. Thought you liked nice even numbers.
    • 1998, Marya Hornbacher, Wasted, chapter 8, 1999 HarperPerennial paperback edition, →ISBN, page 253 [1]:
      He put me on the scale in my underwear and socks: 82 pounds. [] I left, humming all day long, remembering that once upon a time my ideal weight had been 84, and now I’d even beaten that. I decided 80 was a better number, a nice even number to be.
  6. On equal monetary terms; neither owing nor being owed.
  7. (colloquial) On equal terms of a moral sort; quits.
  8. parallel; on a level; reaching the same limit.
    • 1611, Bible (King James Version), Luke xix. 44
      And shall lay thee even with the ground.
  9. (obsolete) Without an irregularity, flaw, or blemish; pure.
  10. (obsolete) Associate; fellow; of the same condition.
    • c. 1382–1395, John Wycliffe, Bible – Matthew 18.29
      His even servant.
Usage notes
  • Because of confusion with the “divisible by two” sense, use of even to mean “convenient for rounding” is rare; the synonym round is more common.
Synonyms
  • (flat and level): flat, level, uniform; see also Thesaurus:smooth
  • (without great variation): regular, monotone (voice); see also Thesaurus:steady
  • (equal): level, on par; see also Thesaurus:equal
  • (convenient for rounding): round
  • (on equal monetary terms): quits (colloquial, UK)
  • (on equal moral terms): quits, square
Antonyms
  • (flat and level): uneven
  • (divisible by two): odd
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

even (third-person singular simple present evens, present participle evening, simple past and past participle evened)

  1. (transitive) To make flat and level.
    • This temple Xerxes evened with the soil.
  2. (transitive, obsolete) To equal.
  3. (intransitive, obsolete) To be equal.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Carew to this entry?)
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To place in an equal state, as to obligation, or in a state in which nothing is due on either side; to balance, as accounts; to make quits.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To set right; to complete.
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To act up to; to keep pace with.
Synonyms
  • (to make flat and level): flatten, level
  • (to equal): match
  • (to place in an equal state): settle
Derived terms
Translations

Adverb

even (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) Exactly, just, fully.
  2. In reality; implying an extreme example in the case mentioned, as compared to the implied reality.
  3. Emphasizing a comparative.
  4. Signalling a correction of one’s previous utterance; rather, that is.
Synonyms
  • (exactly, just, fully): definitely, precisely; see also Thesaurus:exactly
  • (implying extreme example): so much as
  • (correction to previous utterance): See Thesaurus:in other words
Derived terms
  • even as we speak
  • even so
  • even though
  • not even (adverb)
  • not even one
Translations

Noun

even (plural evens)

  1. (mathematics, diminutive) An even number.
Translations

References

Etymology 2

From Middle English even, from Old English ǣfen, from Proto-Germanic *ēbanþs.

Cognate with Dutch avond, Low German Avend, German Abend, Danish aften. See also the related terms eve and evening.

Noun

even (plural evens)

  1. (archaic or poetic) Evening.
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Matthew ch. 8:
      When the even was come they brought unto him many that were possessed with devylles […].
    • 1609, William Shakespeare, Sonnet 28:
      When sparkling stars twire not, thou gild’st the even.
Synonyms
  • evening, eventide; see also Thesaurus:evening
Derived terms
  • evenfall
  • evensong
  • yestereven
Related terms
  • eve
  • evening
Translations

Anagrams

  • Neve, eevn, neve, névé

Dutch

Alternative forms

  • effen (for the temporal senses of the adverb; colloquial)
  • effe (for the temporal senses of the adverb; colloquial)
  • ff (for the temporal senses of the adverb; slang, common chat abbreviation)

Etymology

From Middle Dutch even, effen, from Old Dutch *evan, from Proto-West Germanic *ebn, from Proto-Germanic *ebnaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈeː.və(n)/
  • Hyphenation: even
  • Rhymes: -eːvən

Adverb

even

  1. shortly, briefly
  2. for a short period, for a while
  3. for a moment; modal particle indicating that the speaker expects that something will require little time or effort.
  4. just as, to the same degree (used with an adjective)
  5. (Netherlands) quite, rather

Synonyms

  • eventjes
  • effentjes

Descendants

  • Javindo: efen
  • Negerhollands: even, eeven

Adjective

even (not comparable)

  1. even, opposite of odd

Inflection

Antonyms

  • oneven

Derived terms

  • evenals

Anagrams

  • veen
  • neve

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch *evan, from Proto-West Germanic *ebn, from Proto-Germanic *ebnaz.

Adjective

ēven

  1. even, equal

Inflection

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

  • Dutch: even
  • Limburgish: aeve

Adverb

ēven

  1. just as, equally

Descendants

  • Dutch: even

Further reading

  • “even (I)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • “even (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “even (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “evene (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page evene

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • eve, aven, yeven

Etymology

From Old English ǣfen, from Proto-West Germanic *ābanþ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛːvən/

Noun

even (plural evenes)

  1. eve

Descendants

  • English: eve, even
  • Scots: evin, ewin, e’en, een
  • Yola: eave

References

  • “ēve(n, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

even m

  1. definite singular of eve

Anagrams

  • Even, even, evne, neve, veen, vene


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈflʌʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ʌʃ

Etymology 1

From Middle English flusshen, fluschen, of uncertain origin. Perhaps related to Middle English flasshen, flasschen, flaschen, see flash; or a Middle English blend of flowen (to flow) +‎ guschen (to gush). Compare with German flutschen.

Noun

flush (plural flushes)

  1. A group of birds that have suddenly started up from undergrowth, trees etc.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, V.2:
      As when a Faulcon hath with nimble flight / Flowne at a flush of Ducks foreby the brooke […].

Verb

flush (third-person singular simple present flushes, present participle flushing, simple past and past participle flushed)

  1. (transitive) To cause to take flight from concealment.
  2. (intransitive) To take suddenly to flight, especially from cover.
    • 1613, William Browne, Britannia’s Pastorals
      flushing from one spray unto another
    • 1972, United States. Congress. Senate. Committee on Appropriations. Subcommittee on Department of Defense, Department of Defense Appropriations for Fiscal Year 1973 (page 460)
      AWACS is survivable due to its ability to flush on warning, to maneuver at jet speeds, to maintain awareness of the developing air situation and to command weapons as appropriate, including weapons for its own defense.
Translations

Etymology 2

Same as Etymology 3, according to the American Heritage Dictionary.

Adjective

flush (comparative flusher, superlative flushest)

  1. Smooth, even, aligned; not sticking out.
  2. Wealthy or well off.
  3. (typography) Short for flush left and right; a body of text aligned with both its left and right margins.
  4. Full of vigour; fresh; glowing; bright.
  5. Affluent; abounding; well furnished or suppled; hence, liberal; prodigal.
    • 1712, John Arbuthnot, The History of John Bull
      Lord Strut was not very flush in ready.
Synonyms
  • (typography): double-clean, flush left and right, forced, forced justified, force justified, justified
Derived terms
  • flush left, flush right, flush left and right
Translations

Etymology 3

Probably from Etymology 1 according to the American Heritage Dictionary.

Noun

flush (plural flushes)

  1. A sudden flowing; a rush which fills or overflows, as of water for cleansing purposes.
    • in manner of a wave or flush
  2. Particularly, such a cleansing of a toilet.
  3. A suffusion of the face with blood, as from fear, shame, modesty, or intensity of feeling of any kind; a blush; a glow.
    • 1830, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Madeline
      the flush of anger’d shame
  4. Any tinge of red colour like that produced on the cheeks by a sudden rush of blood.
  5. A sudden flood or rush of feeling; a thrill of excitement, animation, etc.
Translations

Verb

flush (third-person singular simple present flushes, present participle flushing, simple past and past participle flushed)

  1. (transitive) To cleanse by flooding with generous quantities of a fluid.
  2. (transitive) Particularly, to cleanse a toilet by introducing a large amount of water.
  3. (intransitive) To become suffused with reddish color due to embarrassment, excitement, overheating, or other systemic disturbance, to blush.
    • 1872, The Argosy. Edited by Mrs. Henry Wood. Volume XIV. July to December, 1872, London, p. 60 (Google)
      She turned, laughing at the surprise, and flushing with pleasure.
  4. (transitive) To cause to blush.
    • Nor flush with shame the passing virgin’s cheek.
    • 1925, Fruit of the Flower, by Countee Cullen
      “Who plants a seed begets a bud, — Extract of that same root; — Why marvel at the hectic blood — That flushes this wild fruit?”
  5. To cause to be full; to flood; to overflow; to overwhelm with water.
  6. (transitive) To excite, inflame.
    • , “Against Long Extemporary Prayers”
      such things as can only feed his pride and flush his ambition
  7. (intransitive, of a toilet) To be cleansed by being flooded with generous quantities of water.
  8. (transitive, computing) To clear (a buffer) of its contents.
  9. To flow and spread suddenly; to rush.
    • 1545, John Bale, The Image of Both Churches
      the flushing noise of many waters
  10. To show red; to shine suddenly; to glow.
  11. (masonry) To fill in (joints); to point the level; to make them flush.
  12. (mining, intransitive) To operate a placer mine, where the continuous supply of water is insufficient, by holding back the water, and releasing it periodically in a flood.
  13. (mining) To fill underground spaces, especially in coal mines, with material carried by water, which, after drainage, constitutes a compact mass.
  14. (intransitive, transitive) To dispose or be disposed of by flushing down a toilet
Usage notes

In sense “turn red with embarrassment”, blush is more common. More finely, in indicating the actual change, blush is usual – “He blushed with embarrassment” – but in indicating state, flushed is also common – “He was flushed with excitement”.

Synonyms
  • (turn red with embarrassment): blush
Translations

Etymology 4

Probably from Middle French flus (flow), cognate with flux.

Noun

flush (plural flushes)

  1. (poker) A hand consisting of all cards with the same suit.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • French: flush
  • Korean: 플러쉬 (peulleoswi)
  • Portuguese: flush
Translations

See also


French

Etymology

From English flush.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flœʃ/

Noun

flush m (plural flushs)

  1. (poker) flush
  2. (anglicism) flush (reddening of the face)
  3. (anglicism, IT) emptying of the cache

Synonyms

  • (poker): couleur

Derived terms

  • quinte flush

Derived terms

  • flusher

Portuguese

Etymology

From English flush.

Noun

flush m (plural flushes)

  1. (poker) flush (hand consisting of all cards with the same suit)

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