ever vs nonstop what difference

what is difference between ever and nonstop

English

Alternative forms

  • euer (obsolete)
  • e’er, ev’r (poetic)
  • eva, evah, eva’, evuh, iver (dialectal)

Etymology

From Middle English ever, from Old English ǣfre, originally a phrase whose first element undoubtedly consists of Old English ā (ever, always) + in (in) + an element possibly from feorh (life, existence) (dative fēore). Compare Old English ā tō fēore (ever in life), Old English feorhlīf (life).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɛvə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɛvɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛvə(r)
  • Hyphenation: ev‧er

Adverb

ever (not comparable)

  1. Always, frequently, forever.
    • 1592, George Savile, 1st Marquess of Halifax, An Advertisement [] concerning Seminary Priests
      [] the Lord Treasurer, who ever secretly feigned himself to be a Moderator and Mollifier of the Catholicks Afflictions []
    • “A tight little craft,” was Austin’s invariable comment on the matron; []. ¶ Near her wandered her husband, orientally bland, invariably affable, and from time to time squinting sideways, as usual, in the ever-renewed expectation that he might catch a glimpse of his stiff, retroussé moustache.
    • 1993, Nancy K. Florida, Javanese Literature in Surakarta Manuscripts: Introduction and manuscripts of the Karaton Surakarta, SEAP Publications (→ISBN), page 9:
      The library staffs of the Karaton Surakarta’s Sasana Pustaka, the Mangku- nagaran’s Reksa Pustaka, and the Museum Radyapustaka were ever helpful and generous with their time.
    • 2007, Roman Frydman, Michael D. Goldberg, Imperfect Knowledge Economics: Exchange Rates and Risk, Princeton University Press (→ISBN)
      As with the rest of macroeconomics, the issues have to be rethought in a way that makes the ever-imperfect knowledge of market participants and policymakers an integral part of the analysis.
  2. Continuously, constantly, all the time (for the complete duration).
    People struggled to cope with the ever-increasing cost of living.
  3. At any time.
  4. In any way.
  5. (informal) As intensifier following an interrogative word.

Synonyms

  • (always): See Thesaurus:forever
  • (at any time):
  • (in any way):
  • (intensifier): See Thesaurus:the dickens

Antonyms

  • (always): See Thesaurus:never

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Adjective

ever (not comparable)

  1. (epidemiology) Occurring at any time, occurring even but once during a timespan.

Determiner

ever

  1. (dialectal and informal) Shortening of every
    • 2011, Lee Smith, Oral History →ISBN
      Queen Anne’s lace ever place you look.

References

  • ever at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Vere, veer

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch ēver, from Old Dutch *evur, from Proto-West Germanic *ebur. Cognate with Latin aper, Proto-Slavic *veprь (wild boar).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈeː.vər/
  • Hyphenation: ever
  • Rhymes: -eːvər

Noun

ever m (plural evers, diminutive evertje n)

  1. wild boar, Sus scrofa

Synonyms

  • everzwijn, wild zwijn

Derived terms

  • everjong
  • everzwijn

Anagrams

  • erve, veer, vere, vree

German

Etymology

From English ever.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛvɐ/

Adverb

ever

  1. (colloquial, youth slang) ever (with superlative)

Synonyms

  • aller Zeiten

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • evre, evir, afre (early)

Etymology

From Old English ǣfre.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛːvər/, /ˈɛvər/

Adverb

ever

  1. ever

Descendants

  • English: ever
  • Scots: evire, evir
  • Yola: eyver, ere

References

  • “ē̆ver, adv.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

ever

  1. present of eve

Anagrams

  • ever, reve, veer

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • evor (non-standard since 2012)

Noun

ever f

  1. indefinite plural of eve
  2. indefinite plural of eva (non-standard since 2012)

Anagrams

  • erve, ever, reve, vere


English

Alternative forms

  • non-stop

Etymology

non- +‎ stop

Pronunciation

Adjective

nonstop (not comparable)

  1. Without stopping; without interruption or break.
    There’s a nonstop flight to Mauritius, but I’m not sitting on the same plane for thirteen hours.
  2. (genetics) Describing a point mutation within a stop codon that causes the continued translation of an mRNA strand.
    Coordinate terms: missense, nonsense

Translations

Adverb

nonstop (not comparable)

  1. Without stopping; without interruption or break
    Synonyms: ceaselessly, endlessly, incessantly; see also Thesaurus:continuously

Translations

Noun

nonstop (plural nonstops)

  1. (travel) A nonstop journey, especially a nonstop flight.
  2. A convenience store in parts of Europe, open 24 hours a day.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:nonstop.
  3. (linguistics) A linguistic sound that is not a stop; a continuant.

Translations

Anagrams

  • pontons

Hungarian

Etymology

From English nonstop.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈnonstop], [ˈnonʃtop]
  • Hyphenation: non‧stop

Adjective

nonstop (not comparable)

  1. nonstop (without stopping or interruption)
    Synonyms: éjjel-nappali, folyamatos, folytonos

Declension

Adverb

nonstop (not comparable)

  1. nonstop (without stopping or interruption)
    Synonyms: éjjel-nappal, folyamatosan, folytonosan

Noun

nonstop (plural nonstopok)

  1. A convenience store open 24 hours a day.
    Synonym: éjjel-nappali

Declension


Romanian

Etymology

From English nonstop.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nonˈstop/

Adjective

nonstop m or f or n (indeclinable)

  1. nonstop (without stopping or interruption)

Adverb

nonstop m or f or n (indeclinable)

  1. nonstop (without interruption)

Noun

nonstop n (plural nonstopuri)

  1. nonstop (convenience store open 24 hours a day)

Declension


Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial