ewer vs pitcher what difference

what is difference between ewer and pitcher

English

Etymology

From Middle English ewer, from Anglo-Norman or Old French ewer, eawer (modern French évier), from Latin aquārium, from aqua (water). Doublet of aquarium.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈjuː.ə/, /ˈjʊə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈju.ɚ/

Noun

ewer (plural ewers)

  1. A kind of widemouthed pitcher or jug with a shape like a vase and a handle.

Derived terms

  • ewery

Hypernyms

  • pitcher

Translations

Anagrams

  • ewre, rewe, we’re, weer, were, were-

Chuukese

Interjection

ewer

  1. yes

Middle English

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Old French ewer, from Latin aquārium.

Alternative forms

  • euer, ewear, ewere, hewer, owere

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛu̯ˈɛːr/, /ˈɛu̯ər/

Noun

ewer (uncountable)

  1. ewer
Descendants
  • English: ewer
References
  • “eure, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Etymology 2

Noun

ewer

  1. Alternative form of eure

Old French

Etymology

ewe +‎ -er, from Latin aquārium, or from an unattested Vulgar Latin *aquāria, from Latin aquārius, from aqua.

Noun

ewer m (oblique plural ewers, nominative singular ewers, nominative plural ewer)

  1. ewer

Related terms

  • ewe
  • sewiere

Descendants

  • French: évier
  • Middle English: ewer, euer, ewear, ewere, hewer, owere
    • English: ewer

References

  • ewer on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub


English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈpɪtʃɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈpɪtʃə/
  • Rhymes: -ɪtʃə(ɹ)
  • Homophone: picture (US, regional)

Etymology 1

pitch +‎ -er

Noun

pitcher (plural pitchers)

  1. One who pitches anything, as hay, quoits, a ball, etc.
  2. (baseball, softball), the player who delivers the ball to the batter.
  3. (chiefly US, colloquial) The top partner in a homosexual relationship or penetrator in a sexual encounter between two men.
  4. (obsolete) A sort of crowbar for digging.
Translations
Further reading
  • pitcher on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

From Middle English picher, from Old French pichier, pechier (small jug), bichier (compare modern French pichet), from Late Latin or Medieval Latin pīcārium, alteration of bīcārium, itself possibly from bacarium, bacar or from Ancient Greek βῖκος (bîkos). Doublet of beaker.

Noun

pitcher (plural pitchers)

  1. A wide-mouthed, deep vessel for holding liquids, with a spout or protruding lip and a handle; a water jug or jar with a large ear or handle.
  2. (botany) A tubular or cuplike appendage or expansion of the leaves of certain plants. See pitcher plant.
Derived terms
  • little pitchers have big ears
Translations
Further reading
  • Pitcher (container) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 3

Noun

pitcher (plural pitchers)

  1. Pronunciation spelling of picture, representing dialectal English.
    • 1934, William Byron Mowery, Challenge of the North:
      She’s purtier’n uh pitcher, son, but what in th’ name o’ thunderin’ snakes c’n you do with ‘er in this here country?
    • 2015, Stephen Gresham, Rockabye Baby:
      Nineteen sixty-nine, shore as hell, Clay Lawrence —that magazine had uh pitcher of ya—was uh All-American defensive back at the University of Missouri.

Anagrams

  • Petrich, priceth, repitch

Gallo

Etymology

From Old French piquer (to pierce with the tip of a sword), from Vulgar Latin pīccare (to sting, strike), from Frankish *pikkōn.

Verb

pitcher

  1. to prick

Spanish

Etymology

From English.

Noun

pitcher m (plural pitchers)

  1. Alternative spelling of pícher

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