exacting vs strict what difference

what is difference between exacting and strict

English

Etymology

exact +‎ -ing

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪɡˈzæktɪŋ/
  • Rhymes: -æktɪŋ
  • Hyphenation: ex‧act‧ing

Adjective

exacting (comparative more exacting, superlative most exacting)

  1. Making excessive demands; difficult to satisfy.
  2. (of an action, task, etc) Requiring precise accuracy, great care, effort, or attention.
  3. (of a person or organization) Characterized by exaction.

Synonyms

  • (difficult to satisfy): demanding
  • (requiring precise accuracy, effort, care, or attention): demanding, niggly, pernickety
  • (characterized by exaction): acquisitive, extortionate, grasping, money-grubbing, rapacious

Translations

Verb

exacting

  1. present participle and gerund of exact

Derived terms

  • exactingly
  • exactingness

See also

  • Thesaurus:fastidious
  • Thesaurus:meticulous


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin strictus, past participle of stringere (to draw tight, bind, contract). Doublet of strait and stretto. See stringent, strain.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɹɪkt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪkt

Adjective

strict (comparative stricter, superlative strictest)

  1. Strained; drawn close; tight.
  2. Tense; not relaxed.
  3. Exact; accurate; precise; rigorously particular.
  4. Governed or governing by exact rules; observing exact rules; severe; rigorous.
  5. Rigidly interpreted; exactly limited; confined; restricted.
  6. (botany) Upright, or straight and narrow; — said of the shape of the plants or their flower clusters.
  7. Severe in discipline.
    Antonyms: lenient, lax, permissive
  8. (set theory, order theory) Irreflexive; if the described object is defined to be reflexive, that condition is overridden and replaced with irreflexive.

Usage notes

  • Stricter and strictest are the grammatically correct forms for the comparative and superlative though outside UK more strict and most strict are more often used.

Derived terms

  • stricten
  • strictly
  • strictness

Related terms

  • stricture
  • stringent
  • strain

Translations

Further reading

  • strict in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • strict in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin strictus, perfect participle of stringere (to draw tight, bind, contract). Doublet of étroit.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stʁikt/

Adjective

strict (feminine singular stricte, masculine plural stricts, feminine plural strictes)

  1. strict

Derived terms

  • strict minimum
  • strictement

Further reading

  • “strict” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Romanian

Etymology

From French strict, from Latin strictus. Doublet of strâmt, which was inherited.

Adjective

strict m or n (feminine singular strictă, masculine plural stricți, feminine and neuter plural stricte)

  1. strict

Declension


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