exaggerate vs magnify what difference

what is difference between exaggerate and magnify

English

Etymology

From Latin exaggeratus, past participle of exaggerare (to heap up, increase, enlarge, magnify, amplify, exaggerate), from ex (out, up) + aggerare (to heap up), from agger (a pile, heap, mound, dike, mole, pier, etc.), from aggerere, adgerere (to bring together), from ad (to, toward) +‎ gerere (to carry).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛɡˈzæ.dʒə.ɹeɪt/, /ɪɡˈzæ.dʒə.ɹeɪt/
  • Hyphenation: ex‧ag‧ger‧ate

Verb

exaggerate (third-person singular simple present exaggerates, present participle exaggerating, simple past and past participle exaggerated)

  1. To overstate, to describe more than is fact.

Synonyms

  • big up
  • overexaggerate
  • overstate
  • hyperbolize

Antonyms

  • (overstate): belittle, downplay, understate, trivialize

Derived terms

Related terms

  • exaggeration

Translations

Further reading

  • exaggerate in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • exaggerate in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • exaggerate at OneLook Dictionary Search

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ek.saɡ.ɡeˈraː.te/, [ɛks̠äɡːɛˈɾäːt̪ɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ek.sad.d͡ʒeˈra.te/, [ɛɡzɑdː͡ʒɛˈrɑːt̪ɛ]

Verb

exaggerāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of exaggerō


English

Alternative forms

  • magnifie (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle French magnifier, from Latin magnificāre, from magnificus.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈmaɡnɪfaɪ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈmæɡnɪfaɪ/

Verb

magnify (third-person singular simple present magnifies, present participle magnifying, simple past and past participle magnified)

  1. (transitive) To praise, glorify (someone or something, especially God). [from 14th c.]
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Acts X:
      For they herde them speake with tonges, and magnify God.
    • 1644, John Milton, Aeropagitica:
      For he who freely magnifies what hath been nobly done, and fears not to declare as freely what might be done better, gives ye the best cov’nant of his fidelity […].
  2. (transitive) To make (something) larger or more important. [from 14th c.]
  3. (transitive) To make (someone or something) appear greater or more important than it is; to intensify, exaggerate. [from 17th c.]
  4. (transitive) To make (something) appear larger by means of a lens, magnifying glass, telescope etc. [from 17th c.]
  5. (intransitive, slang, obsolete) To have effect; to be of importance or significance.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spectator to this entry?)

Derived terms

  • magnifier
  • magnifying glass
  • magnification

Related terms

  • minify (opposite)

Translations


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