examine vs probe what difference

what is difference between examine and probe

English

Alternative forms

  • examin (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English examinen, examenen, from Old French examiner, from Latin exāmināre.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪɡˈzæmɪn/
  • Hyphenation: ex‧am‧ine

Verb

examine (third-person singular simple present examines, present participle examining, simple past and past participle examined)

  1. to observe or inspect carefully or critically
  2. to check the health or condition of something or someone
  3. to determine the aptitude, skills or qualifications of someone by subjecting them to an examination
  4. to interrogate

Synonyms

  • pore over, undersee

Hyponyms

  • cross examine
  • re-examine

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

See also

  • look at

French

Verb

examine

  1. first-person singular present indicative of examiner
  2. third-person singular present indicative of examiner
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of examiner
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of examiner
  5. second-person singular imperative of examiner

Latin

Noun

exāmine

  1. ablative singular of exāmen

Portuguese

Verb

examine

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of examinar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of examinar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of examinar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of examinar

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /eksaˈmine/, [ek.saˈmi.ne]

Verb

examine

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of examinar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of examinar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of examinar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of examinar.


English

Etymology

For verb: borrowed from Latin probare (to test, examine, prove), from probus (good).

For noun: borrowed from Late Latin proba (a proof), from probare (to test, examine, prove); Doublet of proof. Compare Spanish tienta (a surgeon’s probe), from tentar (try, test); see tempt.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /pɹəʊb/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /pɹoʊb/
  • Rhymes: -əʊb

Noun

probe (plural probes)

  1. (surgery) Any of various medical instruments used to explore wounds, organs, etc. [from 15th c.]
  2. (figuratively) Something which penetrates something else, as though to explore; something which obtains information. [from 17th c.]
  3. An act of probing; a prod, a poke. [from 19th c.]
  4. (figuratively) An investigation or inquiry. [from 20th c.]
    They launched a probe into the cause of the accident.
  5. (aeronautics) A tube attached to an aircraft which can be fitted into the drogue from a tanker aircraft to allow for aerial refuelling. [from 20th c.]
  6. (sciences) A small device, especially an electrode, used to explore, investigate or measure something by penetrating or being placed in it. [from 20th c.]
    Insert the probe into the soil and read the temperature.
  7. (astronautics) A small, usually unmanned, spacecraft used to acquire information or measurements about its surroundings. [from 20th c.]
  8. (game of Go) a move with multiple answers seeking to make the opponent choose and commit to a strategy
  9. (biochemistry) Any group of atoms or molecules radioactively labeled in order to study a given molecule or other structure

Synonyms

  • (game of go) yosu-miru

Derived terms

  • probe-and-drogue

Translations

Verb

probe (third-person singular simple present probes, present participle probing, simple past and past participle probed)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To explore, investigate, or question
    If you probe further, you may discover different reasons.
    • 1827, Henry Hallam, The Constitutional History of England
      the growing disposition to probe the legality of all acts of the crown
  2. (transitive) To insert a probe into.

Related terms

  • probable
  • prove
  • proof
  • probity
  • probation

Translations

Further reading

  • probe in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • probe in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Pober, rebop

Asturian

Adjective

probe (epicene, plural probes)

  1. poor

Derived terms

  • probitú

German

Pronunciation

Verb

probe

  1. inflection of proben:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Italian

Adjective

probe

  1. feminine plural of probo

Latin

Adverb

probē (comparative probius, superlative probissimē)

  1. well, rightly, properly, correctly, fitly, opportunely, excellently

Adjective

probe

  1. vocative masculine singular of probus

References

  • probe in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • probe in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • probe in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Spanish

Adjective

probe (plural probes)

  1. Obsolete spelling of pobre

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