example vs instance what difference

what is difference between example and instance

English

Etymology

From Middle English exaumple, example, from Old French essample (French exemple), from Latin exemplum (a sample, pattern, specimen, copy for imitation, etc., literally what is taken out (as a sample)), from eximō (take out), from ex (out) + emō (buy; acquire); see exempt. Displaced native Middle English bisne, forbus, forbusen from Old English bȳsen, and Middle English byspel from Old English bīspell. Doublet of exemplum and sample.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪɡˈzɑːmpl̩/
  • (General New Zealand) IPA(key): /ɘɡˈzɐːmpɯ/
  • (General Australian, US, weak vowel merger) IPA(key): /əɡˈzæmpl̩/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɪɡˈzæmpl̩/
  • Rhymes: -ɑːmpəl, -æmpəl
  • Hyphenation: ex‧am‧ple

Noun

example (plural examples)

  1. Something that is representative of all such things in a group.
  2. Something that serves to illustrate or explain a rule.
  3. Something that serves as a pattern of behaviour to be imitated (a good example) or not to be imitated (a bad example).
  4. A person punished as a warning to others.
  5. A parallel or closely similar case, especially when serving as a precedent or model.
  6. An instance (as a problem to be solved) serving to illustrate the rule or precept or to act as an exercise in the application of the rule.

Synonyms

  • e.g.
  • See also Thesaurus:model
  • See also Thesaurus:exemplar

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • exemplar
  • model
  • pattern
  • quotation
  • template

Verb

example (third-person singular simple present examples, present participle exampling, simple past and past participle exampled)

  1. To be illustrated or exemplified (by).

Further reading

  • example in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • example in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • exempla


English

Alternative forms

  • enstance, enstaunce, instaunce (all obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle French instance, from Latin instantia (a being near, presence, also perseverance, earnestness, importunity, urgency), from instans (urgent); see instant.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɪnstəns/

Noun

instance (plural instances)

  1. (obsolete) Urgency of manner or words; an urgent request; insistence. [14th-19th c.]
  2. (obsolete) A token; a sign; a symptom or indication.
  3. (obsolete) That which is urgent; motive.
  4. (obsolete) A piece of evidence; a proof or sign (of something). [16th-18th c.]
  5. Occasion; order of occurrence.
    • These seem as if, in the time of Edward I., they were drawn up into the form of a law, in the first instance.
  6. A case offered as an exemplification or a precedent; an illustrative example. [from 16th c.]
    • August 30, 1706, Francis Atterbury, a sermon preach’d in the Cathedral Church of St. Paul, at the funeral of Mr. Tho. Bennet
      most remarkable instances of suffering
    • :
      sometimes we love those that are absent, saith Philostratus, and gives instance in his friend Athenodorus, that loved a maid at Corinth whom he never saw []
  7. One of a series of recurring occasions, cases, essentially the same.
    • {{quote-journal|date=11 Oct 2010|author=Mark King|url=https://www.theguardian.com/money/2010/oct/11/property-fraud-on-the-rise%7Ctitle=Homeowners warned to be vigilant as identity and registration fraud rises|work=The Guardian|passage=The organisations claim fraudsters are targeting properties belonging to both individuals and companies, in some instances using forged documents.
  8. (computing) A specific occurrence of something that is created or instantiated, such as a database, or an object of a class in object-oriented programming. [from 20th c.]
  9. (massively multiplayer online games) A dungeon or other area that is duplicated for each player, or each party of players, that enters it, so that each player or party has a private copy of the area, isolated from other players.
    • 2006 September 1, “Dan” (username), “Re: DPS Classes: Why should I heal you?”, in alt.games.warcraft, Usenet:
      As long as the most difficult instance you’ve tried is Gnomeregan, you’re never going to be credible talking about ‘difficult encounters’.
    • 2012, anonymous gamer quoted in Andrew Ee & Hichang Cho, “What Makes an MMORPG Leader? A Social Cognitive Theory-Based Approach to Understanding the Formation of Leadership Capabilities in Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games”, Eludamos, volume 6, page 31:
      Beating a difficult instance becomes second nature after running through it…a few times, with good leaders knowing exactly what to do and how to co-ordinate member actions.
  10. (massively multiplayer online games) An individual copy of such a dungeon or other area.
    • 2005 January 11, Patrick B., “Re: Instance dungeons”, in alt.games.warcraft, Usenet:
      The instance is created for the group that enters it.
    • 2005 December 6, “Rene” (username), “Re: Does group leader affect drops?”, in alt.games.warcraft, Usenet:
      As soon as the first player enters (spawns) a new instance, it appears that the loottable is somehow chosen.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

See also

  • (computing) closure, class, object

Verb

instance (third-person singular simple present instances, present participle instancing, simple past and past participle instanced)

  1. (transitive) To mention as a case or example; to refer to; to cite
    • 1946, E. M. Butler, Rainer Maria Rilke, p. 404
      The poems which I have instanced are concrete and relatively glaring examples of the intangible difference which the change of language made in Rilke’s visions .
  2. (intransitive) To cite an example as proof; to exemplify.

References

  • instance in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • instance in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • ancients, canniest, cantines, catenins, enactins, insectan, tenascin

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛ̃s.tɑ̃s/
  • Rhymes: -ɑ̃s

Etymology 1

From Latin instantia

Noun

instance f (plural instances)

  1. (often in the plural) urgent demand, insistence, plea
  2. authority, forum, agency, body
  3. (law) legal proceedings, prosecution process
  4. (object-oriented programming) instance
Derived terms
  • en instance
  • tribunal d’instance
  • première instance

Etymology 2

A derivative of etymology 1, but reborrowed from English.

Noun

instance f (plural instances)

  1. (computing) instance

Anagrams

  • cantines

Further reading

  • “instance” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

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