example vs model what difference

what is difference between example and model

English

Etymology

From Middle English exaumple, example, from Old French essample (French exemple), from Latin exemplum (a sample, pattern, specimen, copy for imitation, etc., literally what is taken out (as a sample)), from eximō (take out), from ex (out) + emō (buy; acquire); see exempt. Displaced native Middle English bisne, forbus, forbusen from Old English bȳsen, and Middle English byspel from Old English bīspell. Doublet of exemplum and sample.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪɡˈzɑːmpl̩/
  • (General New Zealand) IPA(key): /ɘɡˈzɐːmpɯ/
  • (General Australian, US, weak vowel merger) IPA(key): /əɡˈzæmpl̩/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɪɡˈzæmpl̩/
  • Rhymes: -ɑːmpəl, -æmpəl
  • Hyphenation: ex‧am‧ple

Noun

example (plural examples)

  1. Something that is representative of all such things in a group.
  2. Something that serves to illustrate or explain a rule.
  3. Something that serves as a pattern of behaviour to be imitated (a good example) or not to be imitated (a bad example).
  4. A person punished as a warning to others.
  5. A parallel or closely similar case, especially when serving as a precedent or model.
  6. An instance (as a problem to be solved) serving to illustrate the rule or precept or to act as an exercise in the application of the rule.

Synonyms

  • e.g.
  • See also Thesaurus:model
  • See also Thesaurus:exemplar

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • exemplar
  • model
  • pattern
  • quotation
  • template

Verb

example (third-person singular simple present examples, present participle exampling, simple past and past participle exampled)

  1. To be illustrated or exemplified (by).

Further reading

  • example in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • example in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • exempla


English

Alternative forms

  • modell

Etymology

From Middle French modelle, from Old Italian modello, from Vulgar Latin *modellus, diminutive form of modulus (measure, standard), diminutive of modus (measure); see mode, and compare module, modulus, mould, mold.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈmɒdl̩/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈmɑdl̩/, [ˈmɑ.ɾɫ]
    • Homophone: mottle
  • Hyphenation: mod‧el
  • Rhymes: -ɒdəl

Noun

model (plural models)

  1. A person who serves as a subject for artwork or fashion, usually in the medium of photography but also for painting or drawing.
  2. A person, usually an attractive female, hired to show items or goods to the public, such as items given away as prizes on a TV game show.
  3. A representation of a physical object, usually in miniature.
  4. A simplified representation used to explain the workings of a real world system or event.
  5. A style, type, or design.
  6. The structural design of a complex system.
  7. A successful example to be copied, with or without modifications.
  8. (logic) An interpretation function which assigns a truth value to each atomic proposition.
  9. (logic) An interpretation which makes a set of sentences true, in which case that interpretation is called a model of that set.
  10. (medicine) An animal that is used to study a human disease or pathology.
  11. Any copy, or resemblance, more or less exact.
  12. (software architecture) In software applications using the model-view-controller design pattern, the part or parts of the application that manage the data.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:model

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Descendants

  • Cebuano: model
  • Chinese: 模特兒模特儿 (mótèr), 模特 (mótè), 麻豆 (mádòu), 摩度 (Cantonese)

Adjective

model (not comparable)

  1. Worthy of being a model; exemplary.
    • 1898, John Thorburn, The St. Andrew’s Society of Ottawa: 1846-1897 : sketch, page 40:
      […] from the land of your origin, because you demand the claims of those who believe it more model than yours, […]
    • 1932, Nora Fugger, James Austin Galaston (translator), The Glory of the Habsburgs: the Memoirs of Princess Fugger, page 35:
      Methods of game-preservation in their extensive and well-stocked hunting-grounds were as model as the huntsmanlike management of the hunts.
    • 1934, Charles Ryle Fay, Imperial economy and its place in the formation of economic doctrine, 1600-1932, page 143:
      […] and we press with special severity on one small country whose agriculture is as model as is her way of rural life.
    • 1956, Stephen Rynne, All Ireland, page 54:
      True, it is an untidy county; the farmhouses are much more model than the farms (when we reach Antrim we shall find that the farms are more model than the farmhouses).
    • 1961, Blackwood’s Magazine, volume 289, page 525:
      At our approach the animals made so much noise that the owners of the hut peered round the door to see what was the matter; outwardly rather less model than the farm, there appeared two ancient Basques, emblematically black-bereted, gnarled […]
    • 1968, American County Government, volume 33, page 19:
      But not all the exchanges were as model as the sergeant. Some of the exchangees showed a rigidity and reluctance to adapt.
    • 1999, Michael D. Williams, Acquisition for the 21st century: the F-22 Development Program, page 113:
      It is as model as you can get.
    • 2002, Uma Anand Segal, A framework for immigration: Asians in the United States, page 308:
      While Asians have been perceived as the model minority, it is increasingly clear that some Asian groups are more model than are others, and even within these model groups, a division exists […]
    • 2010, Eleanor Coppola, Notes on a Life, page 140:
      All were neat and well kept which added to the sense that they were more model than real.
    Synonym: ideal

Translations

Verb

model (third-person singular simple present models, present participle (UK) modelling or (US) modeling, simple past and past participle (UK) modelled or (US) modeled)

  1. (transitive) to display for others to see, especially in regard to wearing clothing while performing the role of a fashion model
  2. (transitive) to use as an object in the creation of a forecast or model
  3. (transitive) to make a miniature model of
  4. (transitive) to create from a substance such as clay
  5. (intransitive) to make a model or models
  6. (intransitive) to be a model of any kind

Synonyms

  • modelise, US modelize

Derived terms

Translations

Further reading

  • model in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • model in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • model on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons

Anagrams

  • LModE, molde

Albanian

Etymology

Ultimately from Old Italian modello, from Vulgar Latin *modellus, diminutive form of modulus (measure, standard).

Noun

model m (indefinite plural modele, definite singular modeli, definite plural modelet)

  1. pattern
  2. example
    Synonyms: shembull, mostër

Declension

Derived terms

  • modeloj
  • modelim

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Valencian) IPA(key): /moˈdɛl/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /muˈdɛl/

Noun

model m (plural models)

  1. model

model m or f (plural models)

  1. model (person)

Related terms

  • modelar

Further reading

  • “model” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “model” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “model” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “model” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Cebuano

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: mo‧del

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English model, from Middle French modelle, from Old Italian modello, from Vulgar Latin *modellus, diminutive form of Latin modulus (measure, standard), diminutive of modus (measure),

Noun

model

  1. fashion model
  2. model, poser; someone who poses for a photograph or painting
  3. framework
  4. example

Verb

model

  1. to model
  2. to become or work as a fashion model
  3. to pose
Synonyms
  • modelo

Etymology 2

From the Cebuano phrase mo-deliver ug lunggon (someone who delivers coffins).

Noun

model

  1. (colloquial, humorous) a funeral home worker; a funeral director or funeral attendant See usage notes.
Usage notes
  • Used to poke fun at a good-looking or well-dressed person.

Crimean Tatar

Etymology

From French modèle (model).

Noun

model

  1. model

Declension

References

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary]‎[3], Simferopol: Dolya, →ISBN

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈmodɛl]

Noun

model f

  1. genitive plural of modla

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French modelle, from Old Italian modello, from Vulgar Latin *modellus, diminutive form of modulus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /moːˈdɛl/
  • Hyphenation: mo‧del
  • Rhymes: -ɛl

Noun

model n (plural modellen, diminutive modelletje n)

  1. model (type, design)
  2. model (someone or something serving as an artistic subject)
  3. model (simplified representation)
  4. model (miniature)
  5. model (prototype)
  6. shape, the proper arrangement of something

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: model
  • Negerhollands: modell
  • Indonesian: model
  • West Frisian: model

Indonesian

Etymology

From Dutch model, from Middle French modelle, from Old Italian modello, from Vulgar Latin *modellus, diminutive form of modulus. Doublet of mode, modern, modul, and modus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈmodɛl]
  • Hyphenation: mo‧dèl

Noun

modèl (first-person possessive modelku, second-person possessive modelmu, third-person possessive modelnya)

  1. model,
    1. a style, type, or design.
    2. a person who serves as a subject for artwork or fashion, usually in the medium of photography but also for painting or drawing.
    3. a person, usually an attractive female, hired to show items or goods to the public, such as items given away as prizes on a TV game show.
    4. a representation of a physical object, usually in miniature.
  2. (psychology) role model, a person who serves as an example, whose behavior is emulated by others

Derived terms

  • pemodelan
  • permodelan

Further reading

  • “model” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Polish

Etymology

From French modèle, from Middle French modelle, from Old Italian modello, from Vulgar Latin *modellus, from Latin modulus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmɔ.dɛl/

Noun

model m inan (diminutive modelik)

  1. model (miniature)
    Synonym: makieta
  2. model (simplified representation)
  3. model (style)
    Synonyms: fason, typ
  4. model (structural design)
    Synonyms: paradygmat, szablon, wzorzec, wzór

Declension

Noun

model m pers (feminine modelka)

  1. model (person who serves as a subject for artwork)
  2. model (person who serves as a subject for fashion)

Declension

Derived terms

  • (verbs) modelować, wymodelować
  • (noun) modelownia
  • (adjective) modelowy

Related terms

  • (noun) modeling
  • (adverb) modelowo

Further reading

  • model in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • model in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /moˈdel/
  • Rhymes: -el
  • Hyphenation: mo‧del

Noun

model n (plural modele)

  1. a template

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From German Modell or French modèle, from Italian modello, from Latin modellus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /mǒdel/
  • Hyphenation: mo‧del

Noun

mòdel m (Cyrillic spelling мо̀дел)

  1. model (clarification of this definition is needed)

Declension

References

  • “model” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Turkish

Etymology

Borrowed from French modèle.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /moˈdel/
  • Hyphenation: mo‧del

Noun

model (definite accusative modeli, plural modeller)

  1. model (clarification of this definition is needed)

Declension

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