exasperate vs incense what difference

what is difference between exasperate and incense

English

Etymology

From Latin exasperō; ex (out of; thoroughly) + asperō (make rough), from asper (rough).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /ɪɡˈzæsp(ə)ɹeɪt/
  • (Received Pronunciation, also) IPA(key): /ɪɡˈzɑːspəɹeɪt/
  • Rhymes: -æspəɹeɪt
  • Hyphenation: ex‧as‧per‧ate

Verb

exasperate (third-person singular simple present exasperates, present participle exasperating, simple past and past participle exasperated)

  1. To tax the patience of, irk, frustrate, vex, provoke, annoy; to make angry.
    • c. 1611, William Shakespeare, Macbeth, act 3, scene 6:
      And this report
      Hath so exasperate [sic] the king that he
      Prepares for some attempt of war.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby Dick, chapter 3:
      The picture represents a Cape-Horner in a great hurricane; the half-foundered ship weltering there with its three dismantled masts alone visible; and an exasperated whale, purposing to spring clean over the craft, is in the enormous act of impaling himself upon the three mast-heads.
    • 1853, Charles Dickens, Bleak House, chapter 11:
      Beadle goes into various shops and parlours, examining the inhabitants; always shutting the door first, and by exclusion, delay, and general idiotcy, exasperating the public.
    • 1987 January 5, “Woman of the Year: Corazon Aquino,” Time:
      [S]he exasperates her security men by acting as if she were protected by some invisible shield.
    • 2007 June 4, “Loyal Mail,” Times Online (UK) (retrieved 7 Oct 2010):
      News that Adam Crozier, Royal Mail chief executive, is set to receive a bumper bonus will exasperate postal workers.

Translations

Adjective

exasperate (comparative more exasperate, superlative most exasperate)

  1. (obsolete) exasperated; embittered.
    • c. 1601, William Shakespeare, Troilus and Cressida, Act V, Scene 1,[1]
      Thersites. Do I curse thee?
      Patroclus. Why no, you ruinous butt, you whoreson indistinguishable cur, no.
      Thersites. No! why art thou then exasperate, thou idle immaterial skein of sleave-silk []
    • 1856, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Aurora Leigh, London: Chapman & Hall, 1857, Book 4, p. 177,[2]
      Like swallows which the exasperate dying year
      Sets spinning []

Related terms

See also

  • exacerbate

References

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “exasperate”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Ido

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /eksaspeˈrate/, /eɡzaspeˈrate/

Verb

exasperate

  1. adverbial present passive participle of exasperar

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ek.sas.peˈraː.te/, [ɛks̠äs̠pɛˈɾäːt̪ɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ek.sas.peˈra.te/, [ɛɡzɑspɛˈrɑːt̪ɛ]

Verb

exasperāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of exasperō


English

Etymology

From Middle English encens, from Old French encens (sweet-smelling substance) from Late Latin incensum (burnt incense, literally something burnt), neuter past participle of incendō (I set on fire). Compare incendiary. Cognate with Spanish encender and incienso.

Pronunciation

  • Noun:
    • enPR: ĭn’sĕns, IPA(key): /ˈɪnsɛns/
  • Verb:
    • enPR: ĭnsĕns’, IPA(key): /ɪnˈsɛns/

Noun

incense (countable and uncountable, plural incenses)

  1. A perfume used in the rites of various religions.
  2. (figuratively) Homage; adulation.

Hyponyms

  • joss stick, incense stick

Derived terms

  • incense boat
  • incense cedar

Related terms

  • frankincense

Translations

Verb

incense (third-person singular simple present incenses, present participle incensing, simple past and past participle incensed)

  1. (transitive) To anger or infuriate.
    I think it would incense him to learn the truth.
  2. (archaic) To incite, stimulate.
  3. (transitive) To offer incense to.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
  4. (transitive) To perfume with, or as with, incense.
    • 1603, John Marston, The Malcontent
      Incensed with wanton sweetes.
    • 1837 Thomas Carlyle, The French Revolution: A History
      Neither, for the future, shall any man or woman, self-styled noble, be incensed, — foolishly fumigated with incense, in Church; as the wont has been.
  5. (obsolete) To set on fire; to inflame; to kindle; to burn.

Translations

Anagrams

  • Nicenes

Latin

Participle

incēnse

  1. vocative masculine singular of incēnsus

References

  • incense in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • incense in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • incense in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • incense in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]
  • incense in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

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