exchange vs switch what difference

what is difference between exchange and switch

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛksˈtʃeɪndʒ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪndʒ

Etymology 1

From Middle English eschaunge, borrowed from Anglo-Norman eschaunge, from Old French eschange (whence modern French échange), from the verb eschanger, from Vulgar Latin *excambiāre, present active infinitive of *excambiō (from Latin ex with Late Latin cambiō). Spelling later changed on the basis of ex- in English.

Noun

exchange (countable and uncountable, plural exchanges)

  1. An act of exchanging or trading.
  2. A place for conducting trading.
  3. A telephone exchange.
  4. (telephony, US) The fourth through sixth digits of a ten-digit phone number (the first three before the introduction of area codes).
  5. A conversation.
  6. (chess) The loss of one piece and associated capture of another
    1. (usually with “the”) The loss of a relatively minor piece (typically a bishop or knight) and associated capture of the more advantageous rook
  7. (obsolete) The thing given or received in return; especially, a publication exchanged for another.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  8. (biochemistry) The transfer of substances or elements like gas, amino-acids, ions etc. sometimes through a surface like a membrane.
  9. (finance) The difference between the values of money in different places.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English eschaungen, from Anglo-Norman eschaungier, Old French eschanger, from the Old French verb eschangier, eschanger (whence modern French échanger), from Vulgar Latin *excambiāre, present active infinitive of *excambiō (from Latin ex with Late Latin cambiō). Gradually displaced native Old English wrixlan, wixlan (to change, exchange, reciprocate) and its descendants, wrixle being one of them.

Verb

exchange (third-person singular simple present exchanges, present participle exchanging, simple past and past participle exchanged)

  1. (transitive) To trade or barter.
    I’ll gladly exchange my place for yours.
  2. (transitive) To replace with, as a substitute.
    I’d like to exchange this shirt for one in a larger size.
    Since his arrest, the mob boss has exchanged a mansion for a jail cell.
Synonyms
  • (trade or barter): truck, wrixle; See also Thesaurus:trade or Thesaurus:barter
  • (replace with a substitute): interchange, swap; See also Thesaurus:switch
Derived terms
Translations

Further reading

  • exchange in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • exchange in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • exchange at OneLook Dictionary Search


English

Etymology

Perhaps from Middle Dutch swijch (twig). First known use in c. 1592.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: swĭch, IPA(key): /swɪtʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪtʃ

Noun

switch (plural switches)

  1. A device to turn electric current on and off or direct its flow.
  2. A change or exchange.
  3. (rail transport, US) A movable section of railroad track which allows the train to be directed down one of two destination tracks; (set of) points.
  4. A slender woody plant stem used as a whip; a thin, flexible rod, associated with corporal punishment in the United States.
    • 2007, Jeffrey W. Hamilton, Raising Godly Children in a Wicked World, Lulu.com, page 15:
      “A proper switch is a slim, flexible branch off a tree or a bush. A switch applied to the buttocks stings fiercely. It may leave red marks or bruises, but it causes no lasting damage..”
  5. (music) Synonym of rute.
  6. (computer science) A command line notation allowing specification of optional behavior.
    Use the /b switch to specify black-and-white printing.
  7. (computing, programming) A programming construct that takes different actions depending on the value of an expression.
    • 2004, “Curt”, Can I use IF statements, and still use switches? (on newsgroup microsoft.public.word.mailmerge.fields)
  8. (computing, networking) A networking device connecting multiple wires, allowing them to communicate simultaneously, when possible. Compare to the less efficient hub device that solely duplicates network packets to each wire.
  9. (telecommunications) A system of specialized relays, computer hardware, or other equipment which allows the interconnection of a calling party’s telephone line with any called party’s line.
  10. (genetics) A mechanism within DNA that activates or deactivates a gene.
  11. (BDSM) One who is willing to take either a submissive or a dominant role in a sexual relationship.
    • 2012, Terri-Jean Bedford, Bondage Bungalow Fantasies (page 99)
      Ideally, if one of your ladies happens to be a switch (or would be willing to switch for this scene), I would love to be able to inflict a little “revenge tickling” as well, as part of a scenario.
  12. (historical) A separate mass or tress of hair, or of some substance (such as jute) made to resemble hair, formerly worn on the head by women.
  13. (card games) A variant of crazy eights where one card, such as an ace, reverses the direction of play.

Synonyms

  • (section of railroad track): (UK) points
  • (whip): crop
  • (command-line notation): flag, option, specifier

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • German: Switch

Translations

Verb

switch (third-person singular simple present switches, present participle switching, simple past and past participle switched)

  1. (transitive) To exchange.
  2. (transitive) To change (something) to the specified state using a switch.
  3. (transitive, in modern times Southern US) To whip or hit with a switch.
  4. (intransitive) To change places, tasks, etc.
  5. (slang, intransitive) To get angry suddenly; to quickly or unreasonably become enraged.
  6. To swing or whisk.
    to switch a cane
  7. To be swung or whisked.
    The angry cat’s tail switched back and forth.
  8. To trim.
    to switch a hedge
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  9. To turn from one railway track to another; to transfer by a switch; generally with off, from, etc.
    to switch off a train; to switch a car from one track to another
  10. (ecclesiastical) To shift to another circuit.

Synonyms

  • (to exchange): interchange, swap; See also Thesaurus:switch

Translations

Adjective

switch (not comparable)

  1. (snowboarding) Pertaining to riding with the front and back feet swapped round compared to one’s normal position.
  2. (freestyle skiing) Pertaining to skiing backwards.

Coordinate terms

(snowboarding):

  • goofy
  • regular

Translations

See also

  • switch off
  • switch on

References

Further reading

  • switch on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • switch (corporal punishment) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Finnish

Noun

switch

  1. (BDSM) switch

Declension


French

Etymology

English switch

Adjective

switch

  1. (skiing, snowboarding) switch.

Portuguese

Etymology

From English switch.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈswit͡ʃ/

Noun

switch m (plural switches or switch)

  1. (networking) switch (device connecting multiple wires, allowing them to communicate simultaneously)
  2. (computing) switch (command line notation allowing specification of optional behaviour)
  3. (programming) switch (construct that takes different actions depending on the value of an expression)

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