excise vs strike what difference

what is difference between excise and strike

English

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch excijs, altered under the influence of Latin excisus (cut out, removed), from earlier accijs (tax), from Old French acceis (tax, assessment) (whence modern French accise), from Vulgar Latin *accensum, ultimately from Latin ad + census (tax, census).

Alternative forms

  • excize (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈɛkˌsaɪz/
  • Rhymes: -aɪz

Noun

excise (countable and uncountable, plural excises)

  1. A tax charged on goods produced within the country (as opposed to customs duties, charged on goods from outside the country).
    • 1668 July 3rd, James Dalrymple, “Thomas Rue contra Andrew Houſtoun” in The Deciſions of the Lords of Council & Seſſion I (Edinburgh, 1683), page 547
      Andrew Houſtoun and Adam Muſhet, being Tackſmen of the Excize, did Imploy Thomas Rue to be their Collector, and gave him a Sallary of 30. pound Sterling for a year.
    • 1755, Samuel Johnson, A Dictionary of the English Language, “excise”,
      A hateful tax levied upon commodities, and adjudged not by the common judges of property, but wretches hired by those to whom Excise is paid.
    • 1787, Constitution of the United States of America, Article I, Section 8,
      The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts, and excises, to pay the debts [] of the United States;
Synonyms
  • excise tax
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

excise (third-person singular simple present excises, present participle excising, simple past and past participle excised)

  1. To impose an excise tax on something.

Etymology 2

From French exciser, from Latin excisus, past participle of excīdō (cut out), from ex (out of, from) + caedō (cut).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɛkˌsaɪz/, /əkˈsaɪz/
  • (US) IPA(key): /əkˈsaɪz/

Verb

excise (third-person singular simple present excises, present participle excising, simple past and past participle excised)

  1. To cut out; to remove.
    • 1901, Andrew Lang, Preface to the second edition of Myth, Ritual, and Religion,
      In revising the book I [] have excised certain passages which, as the book first appeared, were inconsistent with its main thesis.
    • 1987, Ann Rule, page 442 of Small Sacrifices,
      Insanity can be cured. Personality disorders are so inextricably entwined with the heart and mind and soul that it is well-nigh impossible to excise them.
Related terms
  • excision
Translations

French

Verb

excise

  1. first-person singular present indicative of exciser
  2. third-person singular present indicative of exciser
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of exciser
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of exciser
  5. second-person singular imperative of exciser

Latin

Participle

excīse

  1. vocative masculine singular of excīsus


English

Etymology

From Middle English stryken, from Old English strīcan, from Proto-Germanic *strīkaną, from Proto-Indo-European *streyg- (to stroke, rub, press). Cognate with Dutch strijken, German streichen, Danish stryge, Icelandic strýkja, strýkva.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) IPA(key): /stɹaɪk/
  • Rhymes: -aɪk

Verb

strike (third-person singular simple present strikes, present participle striking, simple past struck or (obsolete) strook, past participle struck or (see usage notes) stricken or (archaic) strucken)

  1. (transitive, sometimes with out or through) To delete or cross out; to scratch or eliminate.
  2. (physical) To have a sharp or sudden effect.
    1. (transitive) To hit.
    2. (transitive) To give, as a blow; to impel, as with a blow; to give a force to; to dash; to cast.
    3. (intransitive) To deliver a quick blow or thrust; to give blows.
    4. (transitive) To manufacture, as by stamping.
    5. (intransitive, dated) To run upon a rock or bank; to be stranded; to run aground.
    6. (transitive) To cause to sound by one or more beats; to indicate or notify by audible strokes. Of a clock, to announce (an hour of the day), usually by one or more sounds.
    7. (intransitive) To sound by percussion, with blows, or as if with blows.
    8. (transitive) To cause or produce by a stroke, or suddenly, as by a stroke.
    9. (transitive) To cause to ignite by friction.
  3. (transitive) To thrust in; to cause to enter or penetrate.
  4. (personal, social) To have a sharp or severe effect.
    1. (transitive) To punish; to afflict; to smite.
    2. (intransitive) To carry out a violent or illegal action.
    3. (intransitive) To act suddenly, especially in a violent or criminal way.
    4. (transitive, figuratively) To impinge upon.
    5. (intransitive) To stop working as a protest to achieve better working conditions.
      Synonym: strike work
      • 1889, New York (State). Dept. of Labor. Bureau of Statistics, Annual Report (part 2, page 127)
        Two men were put to work who could not set their looms; a third man was taken on who helped the inefficients to set the looms. The other weavers thought this was a breach of their union rules and 18 of them struck []
    6. (transitive) To impress, seem or appear (to).
    7. (transitive) To create an impression.
    8. (sports) To score a goal.
    9. To make a sudden impression upon, as if by a blow; to affect with some strong emotion.
    10. To affect by a sudden impression or impulse.
    11. (intransitive, Britain, obsolete, slang) To steal or rob; to take forcibly or fraudulently.
    12. (slang, archaic) To borrow money from; to make a demand upon.
  5. To touch; to act by appulse.
  6. (transitive) To take down, especially in the following contexts.
    1. (nautical) To haul down or lower (a flag, mast, etc.)
    2. (by extension) To capitulate; to signal a surrender by hauling down the colours.
    3. To dismantle and take away (a theater set; a tent; etc.).
      • 1979, Texas Monthly (volume 7, number 8, page 109)
        The crew struck the set with a ferocity hitherto unseen, an army more valiant in retreat than advance.
    4. To unfasten, to loosen (chains, bonds, etc.).
  7. (intransitive) To set off on a walk or trip.
  8. (intransitive) To pass with a quick or strong effect; to dart; to penetrate.
  9. (dated) To break forth; to commence suddenly; with into.
  10. (intransitive) To become attached to something; said of the spat of oysters.
  11. To make and ratify.
  12. To level (a measure of grain, salt, etc.) with a straight instrument, scraping off what is above the level of the top.
  13. (masonry) To cut off (a mortar joint, etc.) even with the face of the wall, or inward at a slight angle.
  14. To hit upon, or light upon, suddenly.
  15. (sugar-making, obsolete) To lade thickened sugar cane juice from a teache into a cooler.
  16. To stroke or pass lightly; to wave.
  17. (obsolete) To advance; to cause to go forward; used only in the past participle.
  18. To balance (a ledger or account).

Usage notes

  • The past participle of strike is usually struck (e.g. He’d struck it rich, or When the clock had struck twelve, etc.); stricken is significantly rarer. However, it is still found in transitive constructions where the subject is the object of an implied action, especially in the phrases “stricken with/by (an affliction)” or “stricken (something) from the record” (e.g. The Court has stricken the statement from the record, or The city was stricken with disease, etc.). Except for in these contexts, stricken is almost never found in informal or colloquial speech.

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

strike (plural strikes)

  1. (baseball) A status resulting from a batter swinging and missing a pitch, or not swinging at a pitch when the ball goes in the strike zone, or hitting a foul ball that is not caught.
    • 1996, Lyle Lovett, “Her First Mistake” on The Road to Ensenada:
      It was then I knew I had made my third mistake. Yes, three strikes right across the plate, and as I hollered “Honey, please wait” she was gone.
  2. (bowling) The act of knocking down all ten pins in on the first roll of a frame.
  3. A work stoppage (or otherwise concerted stoppage of an activity) as a form of protest.
    Synonym: walkout
    Antonyms: industrial peace, lockout
  4. A blow or application of physical force against something.
    • 1996, Annie Proulx, Accordion Crimes
      [] and they could hear the rough sound, could hear too the first strikes of rain as though called down by the music.
    • 2008, Lich King, “Attack of the Wrath of the War of the Death of the Strike of the Sword of the Blood of the Beast”, Toxic Zombie Onslaught
  5. (finance) In an option contract, the price at which the holder buys or sells if they choose to exercise the option.
  6. (historical) An old English measure of corn equal to the bushel.
  7. (cricket) The status of being the batsman that the bowler is bowling at.
  8. The primary face of a hammer, opposite the peen.
  9. (geology) The compass direction of the line of intersection between a rock layer and the surface of the Earth.
  10. An instrument with a straight edge for levelling a measure of grain, salt, etc., scraping off what is above the level of the top; a strickle.
  11. (obsolete) Fullness of measure; hence, excellence of quality.
  12. An iron pale or standard in a gate or fence.
  13. (ironworking) A puddler’s stirrer.
  14. (obsolete) The extortion of money, or the attempt to extort money, by threat of injury; blackmail.
  15. The discovery of a source of something.
  16. The strike plate of a door.
  17. (fishing) A nibble on the bait by a fish.
    • 2014, Michael Gorman, Effective Stillwater Fly Fishing (page 87)
      I must admit that my focus was divided, which limited my fishing success. I made a few casts, then arranged my inanimate subjects and took photos. When my indicator went down on my first strike, I cleanly missed the hook up.

Derived terms

Translations

Descendants

  • German: streiken

References

Further reading

  • strike in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • Farmer, John Stephen (1904) Slang and Its Analogues[2], volume 7, page 12

Anagrams

  • Kister, kiters, trikes

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stʁajk/

Noun

strike m (plural strikes)

  1. (bowling) a strike

Derived terms

  • striker

Related terms

  • spare

Italian

Noun

strike m (invariable)

  1. strike (in baseball and ten-pin bowling)

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English strike.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈstɾajk/, /is.ˈtɾaj.ki/

Noun

strike m (plural strikes)

  1. (bowling) strike (the act of knocking down all pins)
  2. (baseball) strike (the act of missing a swing at the ball)

Spanish

Etymology

From English strike.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈstɾaik/, [ˈst̪ɾai̯k]
  • IPA(key): /esˈtɾaik/, [esˈt̪ɾai̯k]

Noun

strike m (plural strikes)

  1. (baseball) strike
  2. (bowling) strike

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