excite vs shake what difference

what is difference between excite and shake

English

Etymology

From Middle English exciten, from Old French exciter, from Latin excitare (call out, call forth, arouse, wake up, stimulate), frequentative of exciere (call out, arouse excite), from ex (out) + ciere (call, summon). See cite and compare to accite, concite, incite.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪkˈsaɪt/
  • Rhymes: -aɪt
  • Hyphenation: ex‧cite

Verb

excite (third-person singular simple present excites, present participle exciting, simple past and past participle excited)

  1. (transitive) To stir the emotions of.
  2. (transitive) To arouse or bring out (e.g. feelings); to stimulate.
  3. (transitive, physics) To cause an electron to move to a higher than normal state; to promote an electron to an outer level.
  4. To energize (an electromagnet); to produce a magnetic field in.

Antonyms

  • relax, calm

Related terms

  • excitement
  • excitation

Translations

Further reading

  • excite in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • excite in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Verb

excite

  1. first-person singular present indicative of exciter
  2. third-person singular present indicative of exciter
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of exciter
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of exciter
  5. second-person singular imperative of exciter

Latin

Verb

excīte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of exciō

Portuguese

Verb

excite

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of excitar
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of excitar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of excitar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of excitar

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [eksˈt͡ʃite]

Verb

excite

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive of excita
  2. third-person plural present subjunctive of excita

Spanish

Verb

excite

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of excitar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of excitar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of excitar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of excitar.


English

Etymology

From Middle English schaken, from Old English sċeacan, sċacan (to shake), from Proto-West Germanic *skakan, from Proto-Germanic *skakaną (to shake, swing, escape), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)keg-, *(s)kek- (to jump, move). Cognate with Scots schake, schack (to shake), West Frisian schaekje (to shake), Dutch schaken (to elope, make clean, shake), Low German schaken (to move, shift, push, shake) and schacken (to shake, shock), Norwegian Nynorsk skaka (to shake), Swedish skaka (to shake), Dutch schokken (to shake, shock), Russian скака́ть (skakátʹ, to jump). More at shock.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈʃeɪk/
  • Rhymes: -eɪk
  • Homophones: sheik, sheikh (one pronunciation)

Verb

shake (third-person singular simple present shakes, present participle shaking, simple past shook or (rare) shaked or (slang) shooketh, past participle shaken or (dialectal) shook)

  1. (transitive, ergative) To cause (something) to move rapidly in opposite directions alternatingly.
  2. (transitive) To move (one’s head) from side to side, especially to indicate refusal, reluctance, or disapproval.
  3. (transitive) To move or remove by agitating; to throw off by a jolting or vibrating motion.
  4. (transitive) To disturb emotionally; to shock.
    Synonym: traumatize
  5. (transitive) To lose, evade, or get rid of (something).
  6. (intransitive) To move from side to side.
    Synonyms: shiver, tremble
  7. (intransitive, usually as “shake on”) To shake hands.
  8. (intransitive) To dance.
  9. To give a tremulous tone to; to trill.
  10. (transitive, figuratively) To threaten to overthrow.
  11. (intransitive, figuratively) To be agitated; to lose firmness.

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

shake (plural shakes)

  1. The act of shaking or being shaken; tremulous or back-and-forth motion.
    The cat gave the mouse a shake.
    She replied in the negative, with a shake of her head.
  2. A milkshake.
  3. A beverage made by adding ice cream to a (usually carbonated) drink; a float.
  4. Shake cannabis, small, leafy fragments of cannabis that gather at the bottom of a bag of marijuana.
  5. (US, slang, uncountable) An adulterant added to cocaine powder.
    • 1989, Terry Williams, The Cocaine Kids, Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, Chapter 2, p. 35,[2]
      [] most suppliers will allow up to 120 grams of shake to a kilo, or 12 percent; kilo-level buyers are usually unhappy if they find more.
  6. (building material) A thin shingle.
  7. A crack or split between the growth rings in wood.
  8. A fissure in rock or earth.
  9. A basic wooden shingle made from split logs, traditionally used for roofing etc.
  10. (informal) Instant, second. (Especially in two shakes.)
  11. (nautical) One of the staves of a hogshead or barrel taken apart.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Totten to this entry?)
  12. (music) A rapid alternation of a principal tone with another represented on the next degree of the staff above or below it; a trill.
  13. A shook of staves and headings.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  14. (Britain, dialect) The redshank, so called from the nodding of its head while on the ground.
  15. A shock or disturbance.
    • 1864, Elizabeth Gaskell, Cousin Phillis
      As long as I had seen Mr Holdsworth in the rooms at the little inn at Hensleydale, where I had been accustomed to look upon him as an invalid, I had not been aware of the visible shake his fever had given to his health.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • (crack or split in wood): knot

Anagrams

  • Hakes, hakes

References


Japanese

Romanization

shake

  1. Rōmaji transcription of しゃけ
  2. Rōmaji transcription of シャケ

Spanish

Noun

shake m (plural shakes)

  1. shake (drink)

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