excite vs stir what difference

what is difference between excite and stir

English

Etymology

From Middle English exciten, from Old French exciter, from Latin excitare (call out, call forth, arouse, wake up, stimulate), frequentative of exciere (call out, arouse excite), from ex (out) + ciere (call, summon). See cite and compare to accite, concite, incite.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪkˈsaɪt/
  • Rhymes: -aɪt
  • Hyphenation: ex‧cite

Verb

excite (third-person singular simple present excites, present participle exciting, simple past and past participle excited)

  1. (transitive) To stir the emotions of.
  2. (transitive) To arouse or bring out (e.g. feelings); to stimulate.
  3. (transitive, physics) To cause an electron to move to a higher than normal state; to promote an electron to an outer level.
  4. To energize (an electromagnet); to produce a magnetic field in.

Antonyms

  • relax, calm

Related terms

  • excitement
  • excitation

Translations

Further reading

  • excite in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • excite in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Verb

excite

  1. first-person singular present indicative of exciter
  2. third-person singular present indicative of exciter
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of exciter
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of exciter
  5. second-person singular imperative of exciter

Latin

Verb

excīte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of exciō

Portuguese

Verb

excite

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of excitar
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of excitar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of excitar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of excitar

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [eksˈt͡ʃite]

Verb

excite

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive of excita
  2. third-person plural present subjunctive of excita

Spanish

Verb

excite

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of excitar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of excitar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of excitar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of excitar.


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /stɜː/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /stɝ/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)

Etymology 1

From Middle English stiren, sturien, from Old English styrian (to be in motion, move, agitate, stir, disturb, trouble), from Proto-Germanic *sturiz (turmoil, noise, confusion), related to Proto-West Germanic *staurijan (to destroy, disturb). Cognate with Old Norse styrr (turmoil, noise, confusion), German stören (to disturb), Dutch storen (to disturb).

Verb

stir (third-person singular simple present stirs, present participle stirring, simple past and past participle stirred)

  1. (transitive) To incite to action
    Synonyms: arouse, instigate, prompt, excite; see also Thesaurus:incite
  2. (transitive) To disturb the relative position of the particles of, a liquid of suchlike, by passing something through it
    Synonym: agitate
  3. (transitive) To agitate the content of (a container), by passing something through it.
  4. (transitive) To bring into debate; to agitate; to moot.
  5. (transitive, dated) To change the place of in any manner; to move.
  6. (intransitive) To move; to change one’s position.
  7. (intransitive) To be in motion; to be active or bustling; to exert or busy oneself.
  8. (intransitive) To become the object of notice; to be on foot.
  9. (intransitive, poetic) To rise, or be up and about, in the morning.
    Synonyms: arise, get up, rouse; see also Thesaurus:wake
    • “Mid-Lent, and the Enemy grins,” remarked Selwyn as he started for church with Nina and the children. Austin, knee-deep in a dozen Sunday supplements, refused to stir; poor little Eileen was now convalescent from grippe, but still unsteady on her legs; her maid had taken the grippe, and now moaned all day: “Mon dieu! Mon dieu! Che fais mourir!

For more quotations using this term, see Citations:stir.

Usage notes
  • In all transitive senses except the dated one (“to change the place of in any manner”), stir is often followed by up with an intensive effect; as, to stir up fire; to stir up sedition.
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

stir (countable and uncountable, plural stirs)

  1. The act or result of stirring (moving around the particles of a liquid etc.)
  2. agitation; tumult; bustle; noise or various movements.
    • 1668, John Denham, Of Prudence (poem).
      Why all these words, this clamour, and this stir?
    • .
      Consider, after so much stir about genus and species, how few words we have yet settled definitions of.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:stir.
  3. Public disturbance or commotion; tumultuous disorder; seditious uproar.
    • 1612, Sir John Davies, Discoverie of the True Causes why Ireland was never entirely subdued
      Being advertised of some stirs raised by his unnatural sons in England.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:stir.
  4. Agitation of thoughts; conflicting passions.

Derived terms

  • cause a stir
  • stirless
  • upstir
Translations

Etymology 2

From Romani stariben (prison), nominalisation of (a)star (seize), causative of ast (remain), probably from Sanskrit आतिष्ठति (ātiṣṭhati, stand or remain by), from तिष्ठति (tiṣṭhati, stand).

Noun

stir (countable and uncountable, plural stirs)

  1. (slang) Jail; prison.
    • 1928, Jack Callahan, Man’s Grim Justice: My Life Outside the Law (page 42)
      Sing Sing was a tough joint in those days, one of the five worst stirs in the United States.
    • The Bat—they called him the Bat. []. He’d never been in stir, the bulls had never mugged him, he didn’t run with a mob, he played a lone hand, and fenced his stuff so that even the fence couldn’t swear he knew his face.
Derived terms
  • stir-crazy

Anagrams

  • ISTR, RTIs, Rist, TRIS, TRIs, Tris, rits, sirt, tris, tris-

Danish

Verb

stir

  1. imperative of stirre

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