excuse vs exempt what difference

what is difference between excuse and exempt

English

Etymology

From Middle English excusen (verb) and excuse (noun), borrowed from Old French escuser (verb) and excuse (noun), from Latin excūsō, excūsāre (to excuse, allege in excuse, literally, free from a charge), from ex (out) + causa (a charge); see cause, accuse and recuse. Displaced native Old English lādian (to excuse) and lādung (an excuse).

Pronunciation

Verb
  • (UK) enPR: ĭkskyo͞oz’, IPA(key): /ɪkˈskjuːz/, /ɛksˈkjuːz/
  • (US) enPR: ĭkskyo͞oz’, IPA(key): /ɪksˈkjuz/, /ɛksˈkjuz/
  • Rhymes: -uːz
Noun
  • (UK) enPR: ĭkskyo͞os’, IPA(key): /ɪkˈskjuːs/, /ɛksˈkjuːs/
  • (US) enPR: ĭkskyo͞os’, IPA(key): /ɪksˈkjus/, /ɛksˈkjus/
  • Rhymes: -uːs

Verb

excuse (third-person singular simple present excuses, present participle excusing, simple past and past participle excused)

  1. (transitive) To forgive; to pardon.
    • c. 1685, John Sharp, A Discourse of Conscience
      If they say that he did sin in doing this, then they must at the same time acknowledge that a man’s persuasion that a thing is a duty will not excuse him from guilt in practising it
  2. (transitive) To allow to leave, or release from any obligation.
  3. (transitive) To provide an excuse for; to explain, with the aim of alleviating guilt or negative judgement.
  4. To relieve of an imputation by apology or defense; to make apology for as not seriously evil; to ask pardon or indulgence for.
    • Think ye that we excuse ourselves to you?

Synonyms

  • (to release from guilt, shame, or punishment): forgive, let off the hook, let pass, pardon, unguilt

Antonyms

  • (to release from guilt, shame, or punishment): blame, punish

Derived terms

  • ‘scuse
  • excuse me
  • excuse my French
  • XQs

Translations

Noun

excuse (countable and uncountable, plural excuses)

  1. (countable, uncountable) Explanation designed to avoid or alleviate guilt or negative judgment; a plea offered in extenuation of a fault.
    • 1604-11, Bible (King James Version), Luke: XIV:18
      And they all with one consent began to make excuse.
  2. (law) A defense to a criminal or civil charge wherein the accused party admits to doing acts for which legal consequences would normally be appropriate, but asserts that special circumstances relieve that party of culpability for having done those acts.
  3. (with preceding negative adjective, especially sorry, poor or lame) An example of something that is substandard or of inferior quality.

Usage notes

  • We often say to make an excuse.

Synonyms

  • (explanation designed to avoid or alleviate guilt or negative judgment): pretext release, clear, justify, forgive, tolerate, overlook, exempt, pardon, discharge, pretext, bear with, acquit, exonerate, absolve, pretense, vindicate.

Translations

Further reading

  • excuse in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • excuse in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

French

Etymology

From excuser.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛk.skyz/
  • (Colloquial) IPA(key): /ɛs.skyz/

Noun

excuse f (plural excuses)

  1. excuse

Verb

excuse

  1. first-person singular present indicative of excuser
  2. third-person singular present indicative of excuser
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of excuser
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of excuser
  5. second-person singular imperative of excuser

Further reading

  • “excuse” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Latin

Participle

excūse

  1. vocative masculine singular of excūsus

Spanish

Verb

excuse

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of excusar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of excusar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of excusar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of excusar.


English

Etymology

From Middle French exempt, from Latin exemptus, past participle of eximō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪɡˈzɛmpt/, /ɛɡˈzɛm(p)t/
  • Rhymes: -ɛmpt
  • Hyphenation: ex‧empt

Adjective

exempt (not comparable)

  1. Free from a duty or obligation.
    • 1679, John Dryden, Oedipus
      ‘Tis laid on all, not any one exempt.
  2. (of an employee or his position) Not entitled to overtime pay when working overtime.
  3. (obsolete) Cut off; set apart.
  4. (obsolete) Extraordinary; exceptional.

Derived terms

  • tax-exempt

Translations

Noun

exempt (plural exempts)

  1. One who has been released from something.
  2. (historical) A type of French police officer.
    • 1840, William Makepeace Thackeray, ‘Cartouche’, The Paris Sketch Book:
      with this he slipped through the exempts quite unsuspected, and bade adieu to the Lazarists and his honest father […].
  3. (Britain) One of four officers of the Yeomen of the Royal Guard, having the rank of corporal; an exon.

Translations

Verb

exempt (third-person singular simple present exempts, present participle exempting, simple past and past participle exempted)

  1. (transitive) To grant (someone) freedom or immunity from.
    Citizens over 45 years of age were exempted from military service.

Related terms

  • exemption

Translations

Anagrams

  • extemp

Catalan

Adjective

exempt (feminine exempta, masculine plural exempts, feminine plural exemptes)

  1. exempt

Related terms

  • exempció
  • eximir

Further reading

  • “exempt” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

French

Etymology

From Latin exemptus, past participle of eximō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛɡ.zɑ̃/

Adjective

exempt (feminine singular exempte, masculine plural exempts, feminine plural exemptes)

  1. exempt

Noun

exempt m (plural exempts)

  1. exempt, (type of) policeman
    • 1844, Alexandre Dumas, Les Trois Mousquetaires, XIII:
      « Suivez-moi, dit un exempt qui venait à la suite des gardes.

Further reading

  • “exempt” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle French

Etymology

From Latin exemptus, past participle of eximō.

Adjective

exempt m (feminine singular exempte, masculine plural exempts, feminine plural exemptes)

  1. exempt

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