excuser vs pardoner what difference

what is difference between excuser and pardoner

English

Etymology

excuse +‎ -er

Noun

excuser (plural excusers)

  1. One who offers excuses or pleads in extenuation of the fault of another.
    • 1730, Jonathan Swift, A Vindication of Lord Carteret
      In vain would his excusers endeavour to palliate his enormities, by imputing them to madness; because it is well known, that madness only operates by inflaming and enlarging the good or evil dispositions of the mind.
  2. One who excuses or forgives another.

References

excuser in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • excurse

French

Etymology

From Middle French excuser, from Old French escuser, borrowed from Latin excūsāre, present active infinitive of excūsō.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛk.sky.ze/
  • (Colloquial) IPA(key): /ɛs.skyze/

Verb

excuser

  1. to excuse; to pardon

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • excusez du peu

Related terms

  • excuse

Further reading

  • “excuser” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Latin

Verb

excūser

  1. first-person singular present passive subjunctive of excūsō

Middle French

Etymology

From Old French escuser, borrowed from Latin excūsō, excūsāre.

Verb

excuser

  1. to excuse; to pardon

Conjugation

  • Middle French conjugation varies from one text to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.



English

Etymology

pardon +‎ -er.

Pronunciation

  • (Canada) IPA(key): /ˈpɑɹdənə/

Noun

pardoner (plural pardoners)

  1. One who pardons.
  2. (historical) In medieval Catholicism, a person licensed to grant papal pardons or indulgences.
    • c. 1390: Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales (Prologue)
      With him there rode a gentle pardonere / Of Ronceval, his friend and his compere, / That straight was comen from the court of Rome.
    • 1917, Catholic Encyclopedia, “Collections” [1]
      These grants of Indulgence were often entrusted to preachers of note (“Pardoners“) who carried them from town to town, collecting money and using their eloquence to recommend the good work in question and to enhance the spiritual privileges attached to it.

Old French

Alternative forms

  • parduner (Anglo-Norman)
  • perdoner (10th century)

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *perdonō, from Latin per- + donō, a calque of a Germanic word represented by Frankish *firgeban (to forgive, give up completely), from *fir- + *geban, or a calque of Proto-Germanic *fragebaną. Akin to Old High German fargeban, firgeban (to forgive), Old English forġiefan (to forgive). More at forgive.

Verb

pardoner

  1. to pardon; to forgive

Conjugation

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. This verb has irregularities in its conjugation. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.

Descendants

  • English: pardon
  • French: pardonner

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