execrate vs loathe what difference

what is difference between execrate and loathe

English

Etymology

From Latin exsecrārī, execrārī, from ex (out) + sacrāre (to consecrate, declare accursed).

Verb

execrate (third-person singular simple present execrates, present participle execrating, simple past and past participle execrated)

  1. (transitive) to feel loathing for; to abhor
    • 1932, Edwin Arlington Robinson, Nicodemus, “Prodigal Son”:
      And were I not a thing for you and me
      To execrate in angish, you would be
      As indigent a stranger to surprise,
      I fear, as I was once, and as unwise.
  2. (transitive) to declare to be hateful or abhorrent; to denounce
    Synonyms: anathematize, comminate, curse, damn, imprecate, maledict, obdurate
  3. (intransitive, archaic) to invoke a curse; to curse or swear
    • 1914, James Joyce, Dubliners, “Counterparts”:
      He longed to execrate aloud, to bring his fist down on something violently.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Further reading

  • execrate in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • execrate in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • execrate at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “execrate”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • excetera, excreate

Latin

Participle

execrāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of execrātus


English

Etymology

Middle English lothe, from Old English lāþian, from Proto-Germanic *laiþāną. Cognate with Old Norse leiðask ( > Danish ledes, Icelandic leiðast, all reflexive), German Leid.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈləʊð/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈloʊð/
  • Rhymes: -əʊð

Verb

loathe (third-person singular simple present loathes, present participle loathing, simple past and past participle loathed)

  1. (transitive) To detest, hate, or revile (someone or something).
    Synonyms: abhor, abominate, despise
    • a. 1667, Abraham Cowley, Of Agriculture
      Loathing the honeyed cakes, I long for bread.

Usage notes

Not to be confused with the related adjective loath.

Alternative forms

  • loath (obsolete)

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:hate

Derived terms

Related terms

  • loath, loth

Translations

Further reading

  • loathe in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • loathe in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • Athole, Theola

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