exercise vs exert what difference

what is difference between exercise and exert

English

Alternative forms

  • exercice (obsolete; noun senses only)

Etymology

From Middle English exercise, from Old French exercise, from Latin exercitium.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɛk.sə.saɪz/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɛk.sɚ.saɪz/
  • Hyphenation: ex‧er‧cise

Noun

exercise (countable and uncountable, plural exercises)

  1. (countable) Any activity designed to develop or hone a skill or ability.
    • an exercise of the eyes and memory
  2. (countable, uncountable) Activity intended to improve physical, or sometimes mental, strength and fitness.
  3. A setting in action or practicing; employment in the proper mode of activity; exertion; application; use.
    • December 8, 1801, Thomas Jefferson, first annual message
      exercise of the important function confided by the constitution to the legislature
    • O we will walk this world, / Yoked in all exercise of noble end.
  4. The performance of an office, ceremony, or duty.
    I assisted the ailing vicar in the exercise of his parish duties.
    • Lewis [] refused even those of the church of England [] the public exercise of their religion.
  5. (obsolete) That which gives practice; a trial; a test.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

exercise (third-person singular simple present exercises, present participle exercising, simple past and past participle exercised)

  1. To exert for the sake of training or improvement; to practice in order to develop.
  2. (intransitive) To perform physical activity for health or training.
  3. (transitive) To use (a right, an option, etc.); to put into practice.
  4. (now often in passive) To occupy the attention and effort of; to task; to tax, especially in a painful or vexatious manner; harass; to vex; to worry or make anxious.
  5. (obsolete) To set in action; to cause to act, move, or make exertion; to give employment to.

Translations

See also

  • train
  • work out

Further reading

  • exercise in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • exercise in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.


English

Etymology

From Latin exsertus, past participle of exsero.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɪɡˈzɝt/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪɡˈzɜːt/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)t
  • Hyphenation: exert

Verb

exert (third-person singular simple present exerts, present participle exerting, simple past and past participle exerted)

  1. To put in vigorous action.
  2. To make use of, to apply, especially of something non-material.

Related terms

  • exertion

Translations

Anagrams

  • retex

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