exercise vs practice what difference

what is difference between exercise and practice

English

Alternative forms

  • exercice (obsolete; noun senses only)

Etymology

From Middle English exercise, from Old French exercise, from Latin exercitium.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɛk.sə.saɪz/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɛk.sɚ.saɪz/
  • Hyphenation: ex‧er‧cise

Noun

exercise (countable and uncountable, plural exercises)

  1. (countable) Any activity designed to develop or hone a skill or ability.
    • an exercise of the eyes and memory
  2. (countable, uncountable) Activity intended to improve physical, or sometimes mental, strength and fitness.
  3. A setting in action or practicing; employment in the proper mode of activity; exertion; application; use.
    • December 8, 1801, Thomas Jefferson, first annual message
      exercise of the important function confided by the constitution to the legislature
    • O we will walk this world, / Yoked in all exercise of noble end.
  4. The performance of an office, ceremony, or duty.
    I assisted the ailing vicar in the exercise of his parish duties.
    • Lewis [] refused even those of the church of England [] the public exercise of their religion.
  5. (obsolete) That which gives practice; a trial; a test.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Verb

exercise (third-person singular simple present exercises, present participle exercising, simple past and past participle exercised)

  1. To exert for the sake of training or improvement; to practice in order to develop.
  2. (intransitive) To perform physical activity for health or training.
  3. (transitive) To use (a right, an option, etc.); to put into practice.
  4. (now often in passive) To occupy the attention and effort of; to task; to tax, especially in a painful or vexatious manner; harass; to vex; to worry or make anxious.
  5. (obsolete) To set in action; to cause to act, move, or make exertion; to give employment to.

Translations

See also

  • train
  • work out

Further reading

  • exercise in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • exercise in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.


English

Etymology

See practise.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɹæktɪs/

Noun

practice (usually uncountable, plural practices)

  1. Repetition of an activity to improve a skill.
    Synonyms: rehearsal, drill, dry run, exercise, training, trial, workout
  2. An organized event for the purpose of performing such repetition.
  3. (uncountable, especially medicine, art) The ongoing pursuit of a craft or profession, particularly in medicine or the fine arts.
    • 2016, Raphael Vella, Artist-Teachers in Context: International Dialogues, Springer (→ISBN), page 53
      Which is the most demanding? I think that my practice as an artist is ‘stronger’ because it is the practice that best fuels and balances myself and that generates new knowledge for my other work as both arts educator and creative arts therapist.
  4. (countable) A place where a professional service is provided, such as a general practice.
    Synonym: general practice
  5. The observance of religious duties that a church requires of its members.
  6. A customary action, habit, or behaviour; a manner or routine.
    Synonyms: custom, habit, pattern, routine, wont, wone
  7. Actual operation or experiment, in contrast to theory.
    Antonym: theory
  8. (law) The form, manner, and order of conducting and carrying on suits and prosecutions through their various stages, according to the principles of law and the rules laid down by the courts.
  9. Skilful or artful management; dexterity in contrivance or the use of means; stratagem; artifice.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)
  10. (mathematics) A easy and concise method of applying the rules of arithmetic to questions which occur in trade and business.

Usage notes

British, Canadian, Australian, and New Zealand English spelling distinguishes between practice (noun) and practise (verb), analogously with advice/advise. In American English, the spelling practice is commonly used for both noun and verb.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • practic
  • practicable
  • practical
  • practitioner

Translations

Verb

practice (third-person singular simple present practices, present participle practicing, simple past and past participle practiced)

  1. (US) Alternative spelling of practise

Derived terms

  • practiced
  • practicing

Further reading

  • practice on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈprak.ti.ke/, [ˈpɾäkt̪ɪkɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈprak.ti.t͡ʃe/, [ˈprɑkt̪it͡ʃɛ]

Adjective

practice

  1. vocative masculine singular of practicus

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