exit vs loss what difference

what is difference between exit and loss

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɛksɪt/, /ˈɛɡzɪt/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɛɡzət/, /ˈɛksət/
  • Rhymes: -ɛksɪt
  • Hyphenation: ex‧it

Etymology 1

The noun is derived from Latin exitus (departure, going out; way by which one may go out, egress; (figuratively) conclusion, termination; (figuratively) death; income, revenue), from exeō (to depart, exit; to avoid, evade; (figuratively) to escape; of time: to expire, run out) + -tus (suffix forming action nouns from verbs). Exeō is derived from ex- (prefix meaning ‘out, away’) + (to go) (ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁ey- (to go)). The English word is cognate with Italian esito, Portuguese êxito, Spanish éxito. Doublet of ejido.

The verb is derived from the noun.

Noun

exit (plural exits)

  1. An act of going out or going away, or leaving; a departure.
    Synonyms: egress, outgoing
    Antonyms: entrance, entry, ingoing, ingress
    1. (specifically, drama) The action of an actor leaving a scene or the stage.
  2. A way out.
    1. An opening or passage through which one can go from inside a place (such as a building, a room, or a vehicle) to the outside; an egress.
      Synonyms: outgang, outway
      Antonyms: entrance, entranceway, entry, (archaic, rare) entryway, ingang, ingress, portal
    2. (road transport) A minor road (such as a ramp or slip road) which is used to leave a major road (such as an expressway, highway, or motorway).
  3. (figuratively, often euphemistic) The act of departing from life; death.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:death
Derived terms
Related terms
  • exits (income, returns, revenue) (historical)
  • issue
Translations

Verb

exit (third-person singular simple present exits, present participle exiting, simple past and past participle exited)

  1. (intransitive) To go out or go away from a place or situation; to depart, to leave.
    Antonyms: arrive, come, enter, ingress
    1. (theater) To leave a scene or depart from a stage.
      Desdemona exits stage left.
  2. (intransitive, often euphemistic) To depart from life; to die.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:die
  3. (transitive, intransitive, computing) To end or terminate (a program, subroutine, etc.)
  4. (transitive, originally US, also figuratively) To depart from or leave (a place or situation).
    Antonym: enter
    1. (transitive, specifically) To alight or disembark from a vehicle.
  5. (bridge, intransitive) To give up the lead.
    • 2014, D. K. Acharya, Standard Methods of Contract Bridge Complete (page 173)
      West now plays a low club to the J and Q. North exits in a trump.
Derived terms
  • exiter
  • exiting (noun)
Related terms
  • exeunt
Translations

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Latin exit, the third-person singular present active indicative of exeō (to depart, exit; to avoid, evade; (figuratively) to escape; of time: to expire, run out); see further at etymology 1 above.

Verb

exit

  1. (intransitive, drama, also figuratively) Used as a stage direction for an actor: to leave the scene or stage.
    Synonym: exeat
Derived terms
  • exit stage left
Related terms
  • exeunt
Translations

References

Further reading

  • exit (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Latin

Etymology

From exeō (exit, go out), from ē (out) + (go).

Verb

exit

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of exeō

Related terms

  • exeunt

Descendants

  • English: exit (used as a stage direction for an actor: to leave the scene or stage)


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English los, from Old English los (damage, destruction, loss), from Proto-Germanic *lusą (dissolution, break-up, loss), from Proto-Indo-European *lews- (to cut, sunder, separate, loose, lose). Cognate with Icelandic los (dissolution, looseness, break-up), Old English lor, forlor (loss, ruin), Middle High German verlor (loss, ruin). More at lose.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /lɒs/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /lɔs/
  • (cotcaught merger, Canada) IPA(key): /lɑs/
  • Rhymes: -ɒs, -ɔːs

Noun

loss (countable and uncountable, plural losses)

  1. (countable) The result of no longer possessing an object, a function, or a characteristic due to external causes or misplacement.
    Antonym: gain
  2. (uncountable) The destruction or ruin of an object.
  3. (countable) Something that has been destroyed or ruined.
  4. (countable) Defeat; an instance of being defeated.
    Antonyms: win, victory
  5. (countable) The death of a person or animal.
  6. (uncountable) The condition of grief caused by losing someone or something, especially someone who has died.
  7. (financial, countable) The sum an entity loses on balance.
    Antonym: profit
  8. (engineering) Electricity of kinetic power expended without doing useful work.
Usage notes
  • The possessive of loss is often constructed as loss of rather than ‘s loss.
  • loss is often the subject of the verbs make or take. See Appendix:Collocations of do, have, make, and take
Derived terms
Related terms
  • lose
Translations

Etymology 2

Pronunciation spelling of lost, representing African-American Vernacular English.

Verb

loss

  1. (colloquial) Alternative spelling of lost

Anagrams

  • SOLs, Sols, sols

Estonian

Etymology

Borrowed from German Schloss.

Noun

loss (genitive lossi, partitive lossi)

  1. castle

Declension

This noun needs an inflection-table template.


Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

loss

  1. imperative of losse

Swedish

Etymology

Like Danish los and Norwegian loss, from Low German or Dutch los, from Middle Low German respectively Middle Dutch los, sidoform of Low German lōs respectively Dutch loos, cognate with Swedish lös.

Adjective

loss

  1. (indeclinable, predicatively, adverbially) loose, untied, off

Anagrams

  • sols

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