expand vs inflate what difference

what is difference between expand and inflate

English

Etymology

Recorded in Middle English since 1422 (as expanden, expaunden), from Anglo-Norman espaundre, from Latin expandere present active infinitive of expandō (to spread out), itself from ex- (out, outwards) + pandō (to spread). Doublet of spawn.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ænd
  • IPA(key): /ɛkˈspænd/

Verb

expand (third-person singular simple present expands, present participle expanding, simple past and past participle expanded)

  1. (transitive) To change (something) from a smaller form or size to a larger one; to spread out or lay open.
  2. (transitive) To increase the extent, number, volume or scope of (something).
  3. (transitive) To express (something) at length and/or in detail.
  4. (transitive, algebra) To rewrite (an expression) as a longer, yet equivalent sum of terms.
  5. (intransitive, algebra, of an expression) To become, by rewriting, a longer, yet equivalent sum of terms.
  6. (transitive, arithmetic) To multiply both the numerator and the denominator of a fraction by the same natural number yielding a fraction of equal value
  7. (intransitive) To change or grow from smaller to larger in form, number, or size.
  8. (intransitive) To increase in extent, number, volume or scope.
  9. (intransitive) To speak or write at length or in detail.
  10. (intransitive) To feel generous or optimistic.

Synonyms

  • (to change from a smaller form/size to a larger one): open out, spread, spread out, unfold
  • (to increase the extent, number, volume or scope of): enlarge
  • (to express at length or in detail): elaborate (on), expand on

Antonyms

  • (to change from a smaller form/size to a larger one): contract
  • (to increase the extent, number, volume or scope of): contract
  • (algebra: to rewrite as an equivalent sum of terms): factor

Derived terms

  • expandable
  • expander

Related terms

  • expanse
  • expansible
  • expansile
  • expansive
  • expansion
  • expansionism

Translations



English

Etymology

From Latin īnflātus, from the verb īnflō.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) enPR: ĭn-flāt’, IPA(key): /ɪnˈfleɪt/
  • Rhymes: -eɪt

Verb

inflate (third-person singular simple present inflates, present participle inflating, simple past and past participle inflated)

  1. (transitive) To enlarge an object by pushing air (or a gas) into it; to raise or expand abnormally
    • 1782, John Scott of Amwell, An Essay on Painting
      When passion’s tumults in the bosom rise, / Inflate the features, and enrage the eyes.
  2. (intransitive) To enlarge by filling with air (or a gas).
  3. (figuratively) To swell; to puff up.
    • Inflate themselves with some insane delight.
  4. (transitive, computing) To decompress (data) that was previously deflated.

Antonyms

  • deflate

Derived terms

  • inflated
  • inflatingly

Related terms

  • inflation

Translations


Latin

Participle

īnflāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of īnflātus

Adverb

īnflātē (comparative īnflātius, superlative īnflātissimē)

  1. haughtily, proudly, pompously

References

  • inflate in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • inflate in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • inflate in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • inflate in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

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