expect vs look what difference

what is difference between expect and look

English

Etymology

From Latin expectāre, infinitive form of exspectō (look out for, await, expect), from ex (out) + spectō (look at), frequentative of speciō (see).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪkˈspɛkt/, /ɛkˈspɛkt/
  • Hyphenation: ex‧pect
  • Rhymes: -ɛkt

Verb

expect (third-person singular simple present expects, present participle expecting, simple past and past participle expected)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To predict or believe that something will happen
    Synonyms: anticipate, hope, look for
    • 2018, VOA Learning English > China’s Melting Glacier Brings Visitors, Adds to Climate Concerns
      And temperatures are expected to keep rising.
  2. To consider obligatory or required.
    Synonyms: call for, demand
    • 1805, Nelson, Horatio via Pasco, John, signal sent at the Battle of Trafalgar:
      England expects that every man will do his duty.
  3. To consider reasonably due.
    Synonyms: hope, want, wish
  4. (continuous aspect only, of a woman or couple) To be pregnant, to consider a baby due.
    • 2011, Eva Fischer-Dixon, The Bestseller
      “You are pregnant?” he asked with shock in his voice. “Yes, Justin, I am expecting a child,”
  5. (obsolete, transitive) To wait for; to await.
    Synonyms: await; see also Thesaurus:wait for
    • 1825, Walter Scott, The Talisman, A. and C. Black (1868), 24-25:
      The knight fixed his eyes on the opening with breathless anxiety, and continuing to kneel in the attitude of devotion which the place and scene required, expected the consequence of these preparations.
  6. (obsolete, intransitive) To wait; to stay.
    Synonym: wait
    • 1636, George Sandys, Paraphrase upon the Psalms and Hymns dispersed throughout the Old and New Testaments
      I will ‘expect until my change in death,
      And answer at Thy call

Usage notes

  • Expect is a mental act and mostly has a reference to the future, to some forthcoming event (e.g. a person expects to die, or he expects to survive). Think and believe may have reference to the past and present, as well as to the future (e.g. I think the mail has arrived; I believe he came home yesterday, that he is at home now). There is a not uncommon use of expect, which is a confusion of the two (e.g. I expect the mail has arrived; I expect he is at home). Await is a physical or moral act. We await something which, when it comes, will affect us personally. We expect what may, or may not, interest us personally. See also anticipate.
  • This is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive. See Appendix:English catenative verbs
Conjugation

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Further reading

  • expect in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • expect in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • expect at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • except


English

Etymology

From Middle English loken, lokien, from Old English lōcian, from Proto-West Germanic *lōkōn. Further origin unknown, no certain cognates outside Germanic. The English word, however, is cognate with Scots luke, luik, leuk (to look, see), West Frisian lôkje, loaitsje (to look), Middle Dutch loeken (to look), German Low German löken, Alemannic German luege and Yiddish לוגן(lugn). Possibly related to Sanskrit लोक् (lok, to see, behold) *lewk- (light) in the sense of “illuminating” (cf. related word रुच् (ruc) “to shine, illuminate”)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lʊk/
    • Rhymes: -ʊk
    • Homophone: luck (most of Northern England)
  • (some Northern Enɡlish dialects, esp. Bolton) IPA(key): /luːk/
    • Rhymes: -uːk
    • Homophone: Luke
  • (Liverpool usually) IPA(key): /luːx/
    • Rhymes: -uːx

Verb

look (third-person singular simple present looks, present participle looking, simple past and past participle looked)

  1. To try to see, to pay attention to with one’s eyes.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:look
    1. (intransitive) As an intransitive verb, often with “at”.
      Troponyms: glance; see also Thesaurus:stare
    2. (transitive, colloquial) As a transitive verb, often in the imperative; chiefly takes relative clause as direct object.
  2. To appear, to seem.
    • c. 1701–03, Joseph Addison, Remarks on Several Parts of Italy, &c., Dedication:
      THERE is a pleaſure in owning obligations which it is a pleaſure to have received; but ſhould I publiſh any favours done me by your Lordſhip, I am afraid it would look more like vanity, than gratitude.
    • So this was my future home, I thought! [] Backed by towering hills, the but faintly discernible purple line of the French boundary off to the southwest, a sky of palest Gobelin flecked with fat, fleecy little clouds, it in truth looked a dear little city; the city of one’s dreams.
    • 2012, Chelsea 6-0 Wolves
      Chelsea’s youngsters, who looked lively throughout, then combined for the second goal in the seventh minute. Romeu’s shot was saved by Wolves goalkeeper Dorus De Vries but Piazon kept the ball alive and turned it back for an unmarked Bertrand to blast home.
  3. (copulative) To give an appearance of being.
  4. (intransitive, often with “for”) To search for, to try to find.
  5. To face or present a view.
    • 1769, Benjamin Blayney (editor), King James Bible, Oxford standard text, Ezekiel, xi, 1,
      Moreover the spirit lifted me up, and brought me unto the east gate of the LORD’s house, which looketh eastward:
  6. To expect or anticipate.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Fairie Queene, Book VI, Canto XI, 1750, The Works of Edmund Spenser, Volume 4, page 139,
      Looking each Hour into Death’s Mouth to fall,
  7. (transitive) To express or manifest by a look.
    • c. 1815, Lord Byron, Waterloo,
      Soft eyes looked love to eyes which spake again,
  8. (transitive, often with “to”) To make sure of, to see to.
    • 1898, Samuel Butler (translator), Homer, The Odyssey,
      Look to it yourself, father,” answered Telemachus, “for they say you are the wisest counsellor in the world, and that there is no other mortal man who can compare with you. []
  9. (dated, sometimes figuratively) To show oneself in looking.
    • c. 1592, William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew, Induction, Scene 2, 1831, George Steevens (editor), The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare, [Publication of the copy annotated by Steevens], Volume 1, page 254,
      I have [] more feet than shoes, or such shoes as my toes look through the overleather.
  10. (transitive, obsolete) To look at; to turn the eyes toward.
  11. (transitive, obsolete) To seek; to search for.
    • c. 1552–1599, Edmund Spenser, unidentified sonnet,
      Looking my love, I go from place to place, / Like a young fawn that late hath lost the hind; / And seek each where, where last I saw her face, / Whose image yet I carry fresh in mind.
  12. (transitive, obsolete) To influence, overawe, or subdue by looks or presence.
    • 1692, John Dryden, Cleomenes the Spartan Hero, a Tragedy, Act 3, Scene 1, 1701, The Comedies, Tragedies, and Operas Written by John Dryden, Esq, Volume 2, page 464,
      A Spirit fit to start into an Empire, / And look the World to Law.
    • 1882, Wilkie Collins, Heart and Science
      Ovid might have evaded her entreaties by means of an excuse. But her eyes were irresistible: they looked him into submission in an instant.
  13. (baseball) To look at a pitch as a batter without swinging at it.

Usage notes

Though the use of the pronunciation /luːk/ is now restricted to northern English dialects, it was formerly more widespread. For example, it is mentioned without comment in Walker’s Critical Pronouncing Dictionary.

Conjugation

Derived terms

Translations

Interjection

look

  1. Pay attention.

Translations

Synonyms
  • see, so, well, hey

Noun

look (plural looks)

  1. The action of looking; an attempt to see.
  2. (often plural) Physical appearance, visual impression.
    • He tried to persuade Cicely to stay away from the ball-room for a fourth dance. [] But she said she must go back, and when they joined the crowd again her partner was haled off with a frightened look to the royal circle, []
  3. A facial expression.

Derived terms

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • kolo, kool

Dutch

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch look, from Old Dutch *lōk, from Proto-Germanic *laukaz. Compare Low German look, Look, German Lauch, English leek, Danish løg, Swedish lök. More at leek.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /loːk/
  • Hyphenation: look
  • Rhymes: -oːk

Noun

look n or m (uncountable)

  1. Plants of the genus Allium, especially garlic.
  2. Several related herbs, like chive, garlic, shallot and leek.
Derived terms
  • lookachtig
  • lookallergie
  • lookbed
  • lookgeur
  • looksaus
  • looksmaak
  • looksoep
  • lookstank
  • lookworst

-plant species:

  • bieslook (chives)
  • berglook (keeled garlic)
  • daslook (bear leek)
  • eslook (shallot)
  • knoflook (garlic)
  • kraailook (crow garlic)
  • lookprei
  • look-zonder-look
  • moeslook (field garlic)

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /loːk/
  • Hyphenation: look
  • Rhymes: -oːk

Verb

look

  1. singular past indicative of luiken

Etymology 3

Borrowed from English look.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /luk/
  • Hyphenation: look
  • Rhymes: -uk

Noun

look m (plural looks)

  1. A look, (clothing) style, appearance.
Derived terms
  • horrorlook

Etymology 4

Related to luiken, cognate with English lock.

Noun

look m (plural loken, diminutive [please provide])

  1. A gap, space between barrels or between the strings in rope.
  2. A section, division (archaic).

Anagrams

  • kool

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English look.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /luk/

Noun

look m (plural looks)

  1. A style; appearance; look.

Derived terms

  • relooker
  • relooking

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English look.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈluk/, [ˈluk]

Noun

look m (plural looks)

  1. (informal) a look; style, appearance

References

  • “look” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Tagalog

Pronunciation

IPA(key): /ˈloʔok/

Noun

look

  1. A bay.

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial