expect vs require what difference

what is difference between expect and require

English

Etymology

From Latin expectāre, infinitive form of exspectō (look out for, await, expect), from ex (out) + spectō (look at), frequentative of speciō (see).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪkˈspɛkt/, /ɛkˈspɛkt/
  • Hyphenation: ex‧pect
  • Rhymes: -ɛkt

Verb

expect (third-person singular simple present expects, present participle expecting, simple past and past participle expected)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To predict or believe that something will happen
    Synonyms: anticipate, hope, look for
    • 2018, VOA Learning English > China’s Melting Glacier Brings Visitors, Adds to Climate Concerns
      And temperatures are expected to keep rising.
  2. To consider obligatory or required.
    Synonyms: call for, demand
    • 1805, Nelson, Horatio via Pasco, John, signal sent at the Battle of Trafalgar:
      England expects that every man will do his duty.
  3. To consider reasonably due.
    Synonyms: hope, want, wish
  4. (continuous aspect only, of a woman or couple) To be pregnant, to consider a baby due.
    • 2011, Eva Fischer-Dixon, The Bestseller
      “You are pregnant?” he asked with shock in his voice. “Yes, Justin, I am expecting a child,”
  5. (obsolete, transitive) To wait for; to await.
    Synonyms: await; see also Thesaurus:wait for
    • 1825, Walter Scott, The Talisman, A. and C. Black (1868), 24-25:
      The knight fixed his eyes on the opening with breathless anxiety, and continuing to kneel in the attitude of devotion which the place and scene required, expected the consequence of these preparations.
  6. (obsolete, intransitive) To wait; to stay.
    Synonym: wait
    • 1636, George Sandys, Paraphrase upon the Psalms and Hymns dispersed throughout the Old and New Testaments
      I will ‘expect until my change in death,
      And answer at Thy call

Usage notes

  • Expect is a mental act and mostly has a reference to the future, to some forthcoming event (e.g. a person expects to die, or he expects to survive). Think and believe may have reference to the past and present, as well as to the future (e.g. I think the mail has arrived; I believe he came home yesterday, that he is at home now). There is a not uncommon use of expect, which is a confusion of the two (e.g. I expect the mail has arrived; I expect he is at home). Await is a physical or moral act. We await something which, when it comes, will affect us personally. We expect what may, or may not, interest us personally. See also anticipate.
  • This is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive. See Appendix:English catenative verbs
Conjugation

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Further reading

  • expect in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • expect in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • expect at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • except


English

Etymology

From Old French requerre (French: requérir), from Vulgar Latin *requærere, from Latin requīrō (I require, seek, ask for).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɹɪˈkwaɪə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɹɪˈkwaɪɹ/
  • Rhymes: -aɪə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: re‧quire

Verb

require (third-person singular simple present requires, present participle requiring, simple past and past participle required)

  1. (obsolete) To ask (someone) for something; to request. [14th-17thc.]
    • I requyre yow lete vs be sworne to gyders that neuer none of vs shalle after this day haue adoo with other, and there with alle syre Tristram and sire Lamorak sware that neuer none of hem shold fyghte ageynst other nor for wele, nor for woo.
    • 1526, Bible, tr. William Tyndale, Mark V:
      I requyre the in the name of god, that thou torment me nott.
  2. To demand, to insist upon (having); to call for authoritatively. [from 14thc.]
    • 1998, Joan Wolf, The Gamble, Warner Books:
      “I am Miss Newbury,” I announced, “and I require to be shown to my room immediately, if you please.”
    • 2009, Vikram Dodd, The Guardian, 29 December:
      ‘Regrettably, I have concluded, after considering the matter over Christmas [], that I can no longer maintain the high standard of service I require of myself, meet the demands of office and cope with the pressures of public life, without my health deteriorating further.’
  3. Naturally to demand (something) as indispensable; to need, to call for as necessary. [from 15thc.]
    • 1972, “Aid for Aching Heads”, Time, 5 June:
      Chronic pain is occasionally a sign of a very serious problem, like brain tumors, and can require surgery.
    • 2009, Julian Borger, The Guardian, 7 February:
      A weapon small enough to put on a missile would require uranium enriched to more than 90% U-235.
  4. To demand of (someone) to do something. [from 18thc.]
    • 1970, “Compulsory Midi”, Time, 29 June:
      After Aug 3 all salesgirls will be required to wear only one style of skirt while on duty: the midi.
    • 2007, Allegra Stratton, “Smith to ban non-EU unskilled immigrants from working in UK”, The Guardian, 5 December:
      The government would like to require non-British fiances who wish to marry a British citizen to sit an English test.

Synonyms

  • call for

Related terms

  • requirement
  • requisite
  • request

Translations

Further reading

  • require in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • require in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • require at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • querier

Interlingua

Verb

require

  1. present of requirer
  2. imperative of requirer

Latin

Verb

requīre

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of requīrō

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