expedience vs expediency what difference

what is difference between expedience and expediency

English

Etymology

From Old French expedience, from Late Latin expedientia, from Latin expediens.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛk.spiː.dɪ.əns/

Noun

expedience (countable and uncountable, plural expediences)

  1. (uncountable) The quality of being fit or suitable to cause some desired end or the purpose intended; propriety or advisability under the particular circumstances of a case.
    • April 11 1690, John Sharp, sermon preached at White-Hall
      to determine concerning the expedience of actions
  2. Speed, haste or urgency.
    • 2008, Thomas Dyja, Walter White: The Dilemma of Black Identity in America (page 178)
      The sense of expedience that allowed White to cut deals and keep moving had made many, mistakenly, see him as shallow or, worse, unprincipled.
  3. Something that is expedient.
  4. (obsolete) An expedition; enterprise; adventure.

Synonyms

  • (fitness or suitableness): expediency
  • (speed, haste or urgency): expediency

Related terms

Translations

References

  • OED2
  • Webster, Noah (1828), “expediency”, in An American Dictionary of the English Language
  • expedience in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • expedience at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “expedience”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.


English

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛk.ˈspiː.dɪ.ən.si/

Noun

expediency (countable and uncountable, plural expediencies)

  1. (uncountable) The quality of being fit or suitable to effect some desired end or the purpose intended; suitability for particular circumstance or situation.
    Synonym: expedience
    • 1810, Thomas Cogan, An Ethical Treatise on the Passions and Affections of the Mind, p. 137:
      Imperfet governments […] may palliate crimes upon the plea of necessity or expediency; divine wisdom discovers no expediency in vice; […]
    • 1828, Richard Whately, Elements of Rhetoric, part II, p. 214:
      Much declamation may be heard in the present day against “expediency”, as if it were not the proper object of a Deliberative Assembly, and as if it were only pursued by the unprincipled.
  2. (uncountable) Pursuit of the course of action that brings the desired effect even if it is unjust or unprincipled.
    Synonym: convenience
  3. (obsolete) Haste; dispatch.
    Synonym: expedience
  4. (countable) An expedient.

Related terms

  • expede
  • expedience
  • expedient
  • expedite
  • expedition

Translations

References

  • OED2
  • Webster, Noah (1828), “expediency”, in An American Dictionary of the English Language
  • expediency in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • expediency at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “expediency”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

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