expiate vs recompense what difference

what is difference between expiate and recompense

English

Etymology

From Latin expiātus, past participle of expiō (atone for).

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈɛk.spi.eɪt/

Verb

expiate (third-person singular simple present expiates, present participle expiating, simple past and past participle expiated)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To atone or make reparation for.
    • 1888, Leo XIII, “Quod Anniversarius”,
      Thus those pious souls who expiate the remainder of their sins amidst such tortures will receive a special and opportune consolation, []
    • 1913, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Return of Tarzan, Chapter VI,
      I am going out to expiate a great wrong, Paul. A very necessary feature of the expiation is the marksmanship of my opponent.
  2. (transitive) To make amends or pay the penalty for.
    • 1876, Jules Verne, translated by Stephen W. White, The Mysterious Island, part 2, chapter 17,
      He had only to live and expiate in solitude the crimes which he had committed.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To relieve or cleanse of guilt.
    • 1829, Pierre Henri Larcher, Larcher’s Notes on Herodotus, vol. 2, p. 195,
      [] and Epimenides was brought from Crete to expiate the city.
  4. (transitive) To purify with sacred rites.
  5. (transitive) To wind up, bring to an end.

Usage notes

Intransitive use, constructed with for (like atone), is obsolete in Christian usage, but fairly common in informal discussions of Islam.

Related terms

  • expiation
  • expiator
  • expiatory

Translations

Anagrams

  • apexite

Latin

Verb

expiāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of expiō


English

Etymology

  • (noun): From Middle English recompense, borrowed from Old French recompense or Medieval Latin recompensa.
  • (verb): From Middle English recompensen, borrowed from Old French recompenser, from Late Latin recompensare, from Latin re- (again) + compensare (to balance out).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌɹɛkəmˈpɛns/
  • Rhymes: -ɛns

Noun

recompense (countable and uncountable, plural recompenses)

  1. An equivalent returned for anything given, done, or suffered; compensation; reward; amends; requital.
  2. That which compensates for an injury, or other type of harm or damage.

Synonyms

  • meed
  • payback
  • recompence
  • restitution

Related terms

  • compensate
  • recompensate

Translations

Verb

recompense (third-person singular simple present recompenses, present participle recompensing, simple past and past participle recompensed)

  1. To reward or repay (someone) for something done, given etc.
  2. To give compensation for an injury, or other type of harm or damage.
  3. (transitive) To give (something) in return; to pay back; to pay, as something earned or deserved.
    • Recompense to no man evil for evil.

Translations


Old French

Etymology

From recompenser.

Noun

recompense f (oblique plural recompenses, nominative singular recompense, nominative plural recompenses)

  1. recompense; compensation

Descendants

  • English: recompense

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˌʁe.kõ.ˈpẽ.si/

Verb

recompense

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of recompensar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of recompensar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of recompensar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of recompensar

Spanish

Verb

recompense

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of recompensar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of recompensar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of recompensar.

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