exploiter vs user what difference

what is difference between exploiter and user

English

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɔɪtə(ɹ)

Etymology 1

exploit +‎ -er

Noun

exploiter (plural exploiters)

  1. One who exploits.
Translations

Etymology 2

Irregular adoption of French exploiter.

Verb

exploiter (third-person singular simple present exploiters, present participle exploitering, simple past and past participle exploitered)

  1. to make use of.
    • 1902, William James, The Varieties of Religious Experience, Folio Society 2008, p. 296:
      Not only must she receive unheard-of personal favours […], but she must immediately write about them and exploiter them professionally.

French

Etymology

From modification of Old French esploiter, esploitier (based on Latin ex-), from earlier espleitier, inherited from Vulgar Latin *explicitāre, a frequentative form of Latin explicāre, explicō. Doublet of expliciter.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛk.splwa.te/

Verb

exploiter

  1. (transitive) to exploit
  2. (transitive) to operate

Conjugation

Related terms

  • exploit
  • exploitation
  • exploité
  • exploiteur

Further reading

  • “exploiter” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Etymology

From Middle English usere, equivalent to use +‎ -er. Cognate with Scots usar, uiser (user).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈjuːzə/
  • (General American) enPR: yo͞o′zər, IPA(key): /ˈjuzɚ/
  • Rhymes: -uːzə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: us‧er

Noun

user (plural users)

  1. One who uses or makes use of something, a consumer/client or an express or implied licensee (free user) or a trespasser.
    • 2019, The Highway Code (United Kingdom) Road Users Requiring Extra Care
      The most vulnerable road users are pedestrians, cyclists, motorcyclists and horse riders. It is particularly important to be aware of children, older and disabled people, and learner and inexperienced drivers and riders. https://www.gov.uk/guidance/the-highway-code/road-users-requiring-extra-care-204-to-225
  2. A person who uses drugs, especially illegal drugs.
  3. (computing) A person who uses a computer or a computing network, especially a person who has received a user account.
  4. (derogatory) An exploiter, an abuser (a person who “uses” people, that is treats and regards people unfairly, selfishly and/or unethically).
  5. (law, dated) In land law, meaning either 1. or 2. above or use. Usually in singular form to mean use wherever there is assiduous re-use of precedents and aloof textbooks verbatim.
    • 2012, R. (Stephen Malpass) v Durham County Council, [2012] EWHC 1934 (Admin) http://www.bailii.org/ew/cases/EWHC/Admin/2012/1934.html
      As to evidence of user
      As to quality of user (i.e. was use by the public “as of right”), the inspector found that the grass over the whole of the application land has been regularly cut…
      …which the inspector did not find sufficient of itself to render user permissive. Moreover, the defendant could not, the inspector advised, rely on communication to users that access to the land was regulated. Deferment to users of the organised pitches…

Usage notes

In modern law, the legal sense is widely disfavored in order to guard against ambiguity.

Synonyms

  • (one that unfairly takes advantage of or exploits): parasite

Antonyms

  • nonuser

Hypernyms

  • person

Hyponyms

  • end user
  • magic user
  • misuser

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • ERUs, Ersu, Reus, Rues, Ruse, rues, ruse, suer, sure, ures

Blagar

Adjective

user

  1. fast

References

  • Antoinette Schapper, The Papuan Languages of Timor, Alor and Pantar: Volume 1 (2014), p. 158

Czech

Verb

user

  1. (vulgar) second-person singular imperative of usrat

French

Etymology

From Latin uso.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /y.ze/

Verb

user

  1. to wear, wear down, wear off, wear out, grind down, run in
  2. to use (used with de)

Conjugation

Derived terms

  • eaux usées
  • usage
  • usé jusqu’à la corde

Further reading

  • “user” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • rues, ruse, rusé, suer, sure, sûre

Gallo

Etymology

From Latin ūsus, past participle of ūtor, ūtī (use, employ).

Verb

user

  1. (transitive, cooking) to boil down

Middle English

Noun

user

  1. Alternative form of usere

Etymology 2

Noun

user

  1. Alternative form of usure

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *unseraz (of us, our), from Proto-Indo-European *n̥s-ero- (our). Cognate with Old Frisian ūse(r) (our), Old Saxon ūser (our), Old High German unsēr, unsār (our), Gothic ???????????????????? (unsar, our), Old English ūs (us).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈuː.ser/, [ˈuː.zer]

Pronoun

ūser (possessive)

  1. (Northumbrian or poetic) Alternative form of ūre

This entry needs an inflection-table template.


Old French

Etymology

From Latin ūtor.

Verb

user

  1. to use; to employ; to make use of

Conjugation

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-ss, *-st are modified to s, st. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.


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