explore vs research what difference

what is difference between explore and research

English

Etymology

From Middle French explorer, from Latin explōrāre (to investigate, search out), itself said to be originally a hunters’ term meaning “to set up a loud cry”, from ex- (out) + plōrāre (to cry), but the second element is also explained as “to make to flow” (from pluere (to flow)).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: ĭksplôʹ, IPA(key): /ɪkˈsplɔː/
  • (General American) enPR: ĭksplôrʹ, IPA(key): /ɪkˈsplɔɹ/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) enPR: ĭksplōrʹ, IPA(key): /ɪkˈsplo(ː)ɹ/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /ɪkˈsploə/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: ex‧plore

Verb

explore (third-person singular simple present explores, present participle exploring, simple past and past participle explored)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To seek for something or after someone.
  2. (transitive) To examine or investigate something systematically.
  3. (transitive) To travel somewhere in search of discovery.
  4. (intransitive, medicine) To examine diagnostically.
  5. (transitive) To (seek) experience first hand.
  6. (intransitive) To be engaged exploring in any of the above senses.
  7. (intransitive) To wander without any particular aim or purpose.
  8. (transitive) To seek sexual variety, to sow one’s wild oats.

Synonyms

  • (examine or investigate systematically): delve into, research

Derived terms

  • explorer

Related terms

  • exploration
  • explorative
  • exploratory

Translations

Noun

explore (plural explores)

  1. (colloquial) An exploration; a tour of a place to see what it is like.
    • 2008, John Watters, Bonza Voyage
      Daylight was fading quickly, but I was still keen to have a little explore of the town and beach.

French

Verb

explore

  1. first-person singular present indicative of explorer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of explorer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of explorer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of explorer
  5. second-person singular imperative of explorer

Portuguese

Verb

explore

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of explorar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of explorar
  3. first-person singular imperative of explorar
  4. third-person singular imperative of explorar

Spanish

Verb

explore

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of explorar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of explorar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of explorar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of explorar.


English

Etymology

Early Modern French rechercher (to examine closely), from Old French recerchier (to seek, to look for).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɹɪˈsɜːtʃ/, /ˈɹiː.sɜːtʃ/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(r)tʃ
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɹi.sɚtʃ/, /ɹiˈsɝtʃ/

Noun

research (countable and uncountable, plural researches)

  1. (uncountable, countable in some dialects) Diligent inquiry or examination to seek or revise facts, principles, theories, applications, etc.; laborious or continued search after truth.
    The research station that houses Wang and his team is outside Lijiang, a city of about 1.2 million people.
  2. (countable, dated) A particular instance or piece of research.
    • 1747, The Scots magazine (volume 9, page 567)
      The first step I took in this so necessary a research, was to examine the motives, the justice, the necessity and expediency of the revolution []

Synonyms

  • investigation
  • exploration
  • examination
  • study
  • inquiry
  • scrutiny

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

  • research octane number
  • research paper
  • recherche

Translations

Verb

research (third-person singular simple present researches, present participle researching, simple past and past participle researched)

  1. (transitive) To search or examine with continued care; to seek diligently.
  2. (intransitive) To make an extensive investigation into.
  3. (transitive) To search again.

Translations

References

  • “research”, in The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th edition, Boston, Mass.: Houghton Mifflin, 2000, →ISBN.
  • “research” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  • “research” in WordNet 2.0, Princeton University, 2003.

Anagrams

  • reachers, searcher

Dutch

Pronunciation

Etymology

From English research, from early Modern French rechercher (to examine closely), from Old French recerchier (to seek, to look for). Forms a doublet with Dutch recherche, which is a direct borrowing from French.

Noun

research f (uncountable, diminutive researchje n)

  1. research

Usage notes

The plural is very rare or non-existent.

Synonyms

  • onderzoek, speurwerk, vorsing, navorsing

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