expose vs peril what difference

what is difference between expose and peril

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French exposer (to lay open, set forth), from Latin expōnō (set forth), with contamination from poser (to lay, place). Doublet of expound, via Old French espondre (to set forth, explain), from the same Latin term.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪkˈspəʊz/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɪkˈspoʊz/, /ɛkˈspoʊz/
  • Rhymes: -əʊz

Verb

expose (third-person singular simple present exposes, present participle exposing, simple past and past participle exposed)

  1. (transitive) To reveal, uncover, make visible, bring to light, introduce to.
  2. (transitive) To subject photographic film to light thereby recording an image.
  3. (transitive) To abandon, especially an unwanted baby in the wilderness.
    • 1893, Fridtjof Nansen, Eskimo Life, page 152:
      This they do, as a rule, by exposing the child or throwing it into the sea.
  4. To submit to an active (mostly dangerous) substance like an allergen, ozone, nicotine, solvent, or to any other stress, in order to test the reaction, resistance, etc.
  5. (computing, transitive) To make available to other parts of a program, or to other programs.
    • 2000, Robert C. Martin, More C++ Gems (page 266)
      In the OO world, the word is to hide the structure of the data, and expose only functionality. OO designers expose an object to the world in terms of the services it provides.

Synonyms

  • (to reveal): bare, nake; see Thesaurus:reveal
    • (a hidden aspect of one’s character): bewray
    • (to remove clothing): doff; see Thesaurus:undress

Derived terms

  • expose oneself
  • exposure
  • exposition

Translations


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛk.spoz/

Verb

expose

  1. first-person singular present indicative of exposer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of exposer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of exposer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of exposer
  5. second-person singular imperative of exposer


English

Etymology

From Middle English peril, from Old French peril, from Latin perīculum. Doublet of periculum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɛɹɪl/
  • (weak vowel merger) IPA(key): /ˈpɛɹəl/
  • Rhymes: -ɛɹɪl, -ɛɹəl

Noun

peril (countable and uncountable, plural perils)

  1. A situation of serious and immediate danger.
  2. Something that causes, contains, or presents danger.
    The perils of the jungle (animals and insects, weather, etc)
  3. (insurance) An event which causes a loss, or the risk of a specific such event.

Synonyms

  • danger, hazard, jeopardy, risk, threat, wathe
  • See also Thesaurus:danger

Derived terms

  • yellow peril
  • imperil

Related terms

  • perilous

Translations

Verb

peril (third-person singular simple present perils, present participle periling or perilling, simple past and past participle periled or perilled)

  1. (transitive) To cause to be in danger; to imperil; to risk. [from 16th c.]
    • 1830, Robert Hayne, Speech in the United States Senate:
      And are we, Mr. President, who stood by our country then, who threw open our coffers, who bared our bosoms, who freely perilled all in that conflict, to be reproached with want of attachment to the Union?
    • 1890, Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. XIV:
      “I will have nothing to do with this matter, whatever it is. Do you think I am going to peril my reputation for you?”

Anagrams

  • piler, plier, prile

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • perile, periil, perel, peryle, pereyl, parelle, peryl, perell, perill, parell, pereil

Etymology

From Old French peril, from Latin perīculum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpɛril/, /pɛˈriːl/, /ˈpɛrəl/, /ˈparəl/

Noun

peril (plural perilles)

  1. Danger, risk, peril; something that is potentially harmful or risky:
    1. A location where danger, risk, or peril is present or likely.
    2. A thing or enterprise which creates peril; anything which creates or which is of peril.
    3. Sinfulness; religious threat or danger.
  2. (Late Middle English) Bad fortune; unluckiness or mischance.

Related terms

  • perilous
  • perilously

Descendants

  • English: peril
  • Scots: peril

References

  • “perī̆l, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-07-15.

Old French

Etymology

From Latin perīculum.

Noun

peril m (oblique plural periz or perilz, nominative singular periz or perilz, nominative plural peril)

  1. peril; hazard; danger

Descendants

  • Middle English: peril
    • English: peril
    • Scots: peril
  • French: péril
  • Norman: péthi (Jersey)

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