expose vs reveal what difference

what is difference between expose and reveal

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French exposer (to lay open, set forth), from Latin expōnō (set forth), with contamination from poser (to lay, place). Doublet of expound, via Old French espondre (to set forth, explain), from the same Latin term.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪkˈspəʊz/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɪkˈspoʊz/, /ɛkˈspoʊz/
  • Rhymes: -əʊz

Verb

expose (third-person singular simple present exposes, present participle exposing, simple past and past participle exposed)

  1. (transitive) To reveal, uncover, make visible, bring to light, introduce to.
  2. (transitive) To subject photographic film to light thereby recording an image.
  3. (transitive) To abandon, especially an unwanted baby in the wilderness.
    • 1893, Fridtjof Nansen, Eskimo Life, page 152:
      This they do, as a rule, by exposing the child or throwing it into the sea.
  4. To submit to an active (mostly dangerous) substance like an allergen, ozone, nicotine, solvent, or to any other stress, in order to test the reaction, resistance, etc.
  5. (computing, transitive) To make available to other parts of a program, or to other programs.
    • 2000, Robert C. Martin, More C++ Gems (page 266)
      In the OO world, the word is to hide the structure of the data, and expose only functionality. OO designers expose an object to the world in terms of the services it provides.

Synonyms

  • (to reveal): bare, nake; see Thesaurus:reveal
    • (a hidden aspect of one’s character): bewray
    • (to remove clothing): doff; see Thesaurus:undress

Derived terms

  • expose oneself
  • exposure
  • exposition

Translations


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛk.spoz/

Verb

expose

  1. first-person singular present indicative of exposer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of exposer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of exposer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of exposer
  5. second-person singular imperative of exposer


English

Etymology

From Middle English revelen (to reveal), from Middle French reveler, from Old French, from Latin revēlāre (to reveal, uncover), from re- (back, again) + vēlāre (to cover), from vēlum (veil).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɹəˈviːl/
  • Rhymes: -iːl
  • Hyphenation: re‧veal

Noun

reveal (plural reveals)

  1. The outer side of a window or door frame.
    Synonyms: jamb, revel
    • 2010, Carter B. Horsley, The Upper East Side Book:
      The building has a one-story rusticated limestone base and a canopied entrance with a doorman beneath an attractive, rusticated limestone window reveal on the second floor and a very impressive and ornate limestone window reveal on the third floor flanked by female figures[1].
  2. (cinematography, narratology, comedy) A revelation; an uncovering of what was hidden in the scene or story.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:reveal.

See also

  • dénouement
  • plot twist

Verb

reveal (third-person singular simple present reveals, present participle revealing, simple past and past participle revealed)

  1. (transitive) To uncover; to show and display that which was hidden.
    Synonyms: uncover, unfold, unveil; see also Thesaurus:reveal
    • c. 1625, Edmund Waller, Of the Danger His Majesty (being Prince) Escaped in the Road at St Andero
      Light was the wound, the prince’s care unknown, / She might not, would not, yet reveal her own.
  2. (transitive) To communicate that which could not be known or discovered without divine or supernatural instruction.
    Synonyms: disclose, divulge; see also Thesaurus:divulge

Derived terms

  • revealed religion
  • revelation

Translations

Anagrams

  • Leaver, laveer, leaver, vealer

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