exposed vs open what difference

what is difference between exposed and open

English

Adjective

exposed

  1. (usually followed by to) Vulnerable, susceptible.

Translations

Verb

exposed

  1. simple past tense and past participle of expose


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: ō’pən, IPA(key): /ˈəʊ.pən/
  • (US) enPR: ō’pən, IPA(key): /ˈoʊ.pən/
  • Rhymes: -əʊpən

Etymology 1

From Middle English open, from Old English open (open), from Proto-West Germanic *opan, from Proto-Germanic *upanaz (open), from Proto-Indo-European *upo (up from under, over). Cognate with Scots apen (open), Saterland Frisian eepen (open), West Frisian iepen (open), Dutch open (open), Low German open, apen (open), German offen (open), Danish åben (open), Swedish öppen (open), Norwegian Bokmål åpen (open), Norwegian Nynorsk open (open), Icelandic opinn (open). Compare also Latin supinus (on one’s back, supine), Albanian hap (to open). Related to up.

Adjective

open (comparative more open, superlative most open)

  1. (not comparable) Not closed
    1. able to be accessed
    2. able to have something pass through or along it.
      • 1908, Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows, Chapter 2
        The open road, the dusty highway []
    3. (of a body part) not covered, showing what is inside
  2. Not physically drawn together, closed, folded or contracted; extended
    • Each, with open arms, embraced her chosen knight.
  3. (not comparable) Actively conducting or prepared to conduct business.
  4. (comparable) Receptive.
  5. (not comparable) Public
  6. (not comparable) Candid, ingenuous, not subtle in character.
    • 1731-1735, Alexander Pope, Moral Essays
      with aspect open, shall erect his head
    • The French are always open, familiar, and talkative.
  7. (mathematics, logic, of a formula) Having a free variable.
  8. (mathematics, topology, of a set) Which is part of a predefined collection of subsets of



    X


    {\displaystyle X}

    , that defines a topological space on




    X


    {\displaystyle X}

    .

  9. (graph theory, of a walk) Whose first and last vertices are different.
  10. (computing, not comparable, of a file, document, etc.) In current use; mapped to part of memory.
  11. (business) Not fulfilled.
  12. Not settled or adjusted; not decided or determined; not closed or withdrawn from consideration.
  13. (music, stringed instruments) Of a note, played without pressing the string against the fingerboard.
  14. (music, wind instruments) Of a note, played without closing any finger-hole, key or valve.
  15. Not of a quality to prevent communication, as by closing waterways, blocking roads, etc.; hence, not frosty or inclement; mild; used of the weather or the climate.
  16. (law, of correspondence) Written or sent with the intention that it may made public or referred to at any trial, rather than by way of confidential private negotiation for a settlement.
  17. (phonetics) Uttered with a relatively wide opening of the articulating organs; said of vowels.
  18. (phonetics) Uttered, as a consonant, with the oral passage simply narrowed without closure.
  19. (phonetics, of a syllable) That ends in a vowel; not having a coda.
  20. (computing, education) Made public, usable with a free licence and without proprietary components.
  21. (medicine) Resulting from an incision, puncture or any other process by which the skin no longer protects an internal part of the body.
  22. (computing, used before “code”) Source code of a computer program that is not within the text of a macro being generated.
Synonyms
  • (not closed): accessible, unimpeded
  • (ending in a vowel): free
  • (with a free license and no proprietary components): free
Antonyms
  • (accessible): closed, shut
  • (law): without prejudice
  • (ending in a vowel): closed, checked
  • (with a free license and no proprietary components): closed-source, proprietary
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English openen, from Old English openian (to open), from Proto-Germanic *upanōną (to raise; lift; open), from Proto-Germanic *upanaz (open, adjective). Cognate with Saterland Frisian eepenje (to open), West Frisian iepenje (to open), Dutch openen (to open), German öffnen (to open), Danish åbne (to open), Swedish öppna (to open), Norwegian Bokmål åpne (to open), Norwegian Nynorsk and Icelandic opna (to open). Related to English up.

Verb

open (third-person singular simple present opens, present participle opening, simple past and past participle opened)

  1. (transitive) To make something accessible or allow for passage by moving from a shut position.
  2. (transitive) To make (an open space, etc.) by clearing away an obstacle or obstacles, in order to allow for passage, access, or visibility.
  3. (transitive) To bring up, broach.
  4. (transitive) To enter upon, begin.
  5. (transitive) To spread; to expand into an open or loose position.
  6. (transitive) To make accessible to customers or clients.
  7. (transitive) To start (a campaign).
  8. (intransitive) To become open.
  9. (intransitive) To begin conducting business.
  10. (intransitive, cricket) To begin a side’s innings as one of the first two batsmen.
  11. (intransitive, poker) To bet before any other player has in a particular betting round in a game of poker.
  12. (transitive, intransitive, poker) To reveal one’s hand.
  13. (computing, transitive, intransitive, of a file, document, etc.) To load into memory for viewing or editing.
  14. (obsolete) To disclose; to reveal; to interpret; to explain.
    • 1622, Francis Bacon, The History of the Reign of King Henry the Seventh
      The king opened himself to some of his council, that he was sorry for the earl’s death.
Synonyms
  • (to make accessible): unseal
  • (to bring up): raise
  • (to enter upon): start; see also Thesaurus:begin
  • (to disclose): bare; see also Thesaurus:reveal
Hyponyms
  • (to make accessible): crack (open a bit)
Antonyms
  • (to make accessible): bare, shut
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English open (an aperture or opening), from the verb (see Etymology 2 above). In the sports sense, however, a shortening of “open competition”.

Noun

open (plural opens)

  1. (with the) Open or unobstructed space; an exposed location.
  2. (with the) Public knowledge or scrutiny; full view.
  3. (electronics) A defect in an electrical circuit preventing current from flowing.
  4. A sports event in which anybody can compete

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Nope, nope, peno-, peon, pone

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch openen, from Middle Dutch ōpenen, from Old Dutch opanon, from Proto-Germanic *upanōną.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈʊə̯.pən/

Verb

open (present open, present participle openende, past participle geopen)

  1. (transitive) to open

Related terms

  • oop

Catalan

Etymology

From English open.

Noun

open m (plural open or òpens)

  1. (sports) open

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈoː.pə(n)/
  • Hyphenation: open
  • Rhymes: -oːpən

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch ōpen, from Old Dutch opan, from Proto-Germanic *upanaz.

Adjective

open (comparative opener, superlative openst)

  1. open, not closed
    Antonyms: gesloten, dicht, toe
  2. open for business
    Antonyms: gesloten, dicht
  3. open, receptive
    Antonym: gesloten
Inflection

Antonyms

  • gesloten
Derived terms
  • openbaar
  • openbaren
  • openen
  • opener
  • opening
  • openlijk
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: oop
  • Negerhollands: open, hopo
    • Virgin Islands Creole: hopo

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

open

  1. first-person singular present indicative of openen
  2. imperative of openen

Anagrams

  • nope

Finnish

Noun

open

  1. genitive singular of ope

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English open.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɔ.pɛn/

Noun

open m (plural opens)

  1. open; open tournament

Further reading

  • “open” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle Dutch

Etymology

From Old Dutch opan, from Proto-Germanic *upanaz.

Adjective

ōpen

  1. open, not closed
  2. open, accessible
  3. freely accessible, public

Inflection

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Derived terms

  • ōpenen

Descendants

  • Dutch: open
    • Afrikaans: oop
    • Negerhollands: open, hopo
      • Virgin Islands Creole: hopo
  • Limburgish: aop

Further reading

  • “open”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929), “open (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page II

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • opyn, ope

Etymology

From Old English open, from Proto-Germanic *upanaz.

Adjective

open (comparative more open, superlative most open)

  1. open
    • 14th c. Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales. General Prologue: 9-11.
      And smale foweles maken melodye,
      That slepen al the nyght with open eye-
      (So priketh hem Nature in hir corages);

      And many little birds make melody
      That sleep through all the night with open eye
      (So Nature pricks them on to ramp and rage)

Related terms

  • open-ers
  • openly

Descendants

  • English: open (obsolete ope)
  • Scots: appen, apen

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse opinn, from Proto-Germanic *upanaz. Compare Danish åben, Icelandic opinn, Swedish öppen, Dutch open, Low German apen, open, German offen, West Frisian iepen, English open.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²oːpɛn/

Adjective

open (masculine and feminine open, neuter ope or opent, definite singular and plural opne, comparative opnare, indefinite superlative opnast, definite superlative opnaste)

  1. open

Related terms

  • opna, opne

See also

  • åpen (Bokmål)

References

  • “open” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *upanaz. Originally a past participle of Proto-Germanic *ūpaną (to lift up, open). Akin to Old English ūp (up). Cognate with Old Frisian open, opin, epen (West Frisian iepen), Old Saxon opan, open (Low German apen, open), Dutch open, Old High German offan, ofan, ophan (German offen), Old Norse opinn (Danish åben, Norwegian open, Swedish öppen).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈo.pen/

Adjective

open

  1. open

Declension

Derived terms

  • openlīċ

Descendants

  • Middle English: open, opyn, ope
    • Scots: appen, apen
    • English: open

Plautdietsch

Adjective

open

  1. open

Spanish

Etymology

From English open.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈopen/, [ˈo.pẽn]

Noun

open m (plural opens or open)

  1. (sports) open

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