expression vs saying what difference

what is difference between expression and saying

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French expression, from Late Latin expressiō, expressiōnem (a pressing out).

Morphologically express +‎ -ion.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪkˈspɹɛʃ.ən/
  • Rhymes: -ɛʃən
  • Hyphenation: ex‧pres‧sion

Noun

expression (countable and uncountable, plural expressions)

  1. The action of expressing thoughts, ideas, feelings, etc.
  2. A particular way of phrasing an idea.
  3. A colloquialism or idiom.
  4. A facial appearance usually associated with an emotion.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:expression.
  5. (mathematics) An arrangement of symbols denoting values, operations performed on them, and grouping symbols.
  6. (biology) The process of translating a gene into a protein.
  7. (programming) A piece of code in a high-level language that returns a value.
  8. A specific blend of whisky.
  9. (biology) The act of pressing or squeezing out.
    expression from a gland
    the expression of milk from the mammaries
  10. (music) The tone of voice or sound in music.
  11. (mostly preceded by with) emotional involvement or engagement in a text read aloud rendered by the voice of the reciter or the reader
    • 1849, Great Britain. Committee on Education, Minutes of the Committee of Council on Education; with appendices. 1847-8-9. England and Wales. Schools of Parochial Unions, etc, page 154:
      The number of children who could read with expression would be very small ; …
    • 1864, Great Britain. Parliament. House of Commons, Accounts and Papers of the House of Commons, page 170:
      I cannot say that all read with expression. Indeed , this power is hardly to be expected in young children . And though “ to read with expression …
    • 1976, Aline D. Wolf, Tutoring is Caring: You Can Help Someone to Read, Parent Child Press
      Perhaps when you were learning to read , you were asked to stand and ” read with expression ” for your classmates  
    • 2010, Kimberly A. Henry, How Do I Teach this Kid to Read?: Teaching Literacy Skills to Young Children with Autism, from Phonics to Fluency, Future Horizons (→ISBN), page 72:
      To read with expression, readers must know when to pause appropriately, must know when to change their tone to reflect the emotions of different characters, …
    • 2014, Edward Fry, Timothy Rasinski, High Frequency Word Phrases Level 3–Reading with Expression, Teacher Created Materials (→ISBN), page 43:
      Think of reading words like reading music. When you read with expression, your audience will understand and appreciate your “performance.” Name …

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

  • expression pedal

Translations


French

Etymology

From Middle French expression, borrowed from Latin expressiō, expressiōnem (a pressing out).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛk.spʁɛ.sjɔ̃/

Noun

expression f (plural expressions)

  1. expression

Derived terms

Related terms

  • exprimer

Further reading

  • “expression” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Interlingua

Etymology

From Latin expressiō, expressiōnem (a pressing out).

Noun

expression (plural expressiones)

  1. expression

Norman

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin expressiō, expressiōnem (a pressing out).

Noun

expression f (plural expressions)

  1. (Jersey) expression


English

Etymology

say +‎ -ing

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈseɪɪŋ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪɪŋ
  • Hyphenation: say‧ing

Verb

saying

  1. present participle of say

Noun

saying (plural sayings)

  1. A proverb or maxim.
  2. (obsolete) That which is said; a statement.
    • c. 1610, William Shakespeare, The Winter’s Tale
      And I’ll be sworn you would believe my saying,
      Howe’er you lean to th’ nayward.

Synonyms

  • maxim, proverb, saw, expression
  • See also Thesaurus:saying

Translations

Further reading

  • saying in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • saying in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

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