exquisite vs keen what difference

what is difference between exquisite and keen

English

Etymology

From Latin exquīsītus, perfect passive participle of exquīrō (seek out).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɪkˈskwɪzɪt/, /ˈɛkskwɪzɪt/

Adjective

exquisite (comparative more exquisite, superlative most exquisite)

  1. Especially fine or pleasing; exceptional.
    • Selwyn, sitting up rumpled and cross-legged on the floor, after having boloed Drina to everybody’s exquisite satisfaction, looked around at the sudden rustle of skirts to catch a glimpse of a vanishing figure—a glimmer of ruddy hair and the white curve of a youthful face, half-buried in a muff.
  2. (obsolete) Carefully adjusted; precise; accurate; exact.
  3. Recherché; far-fetched; abstruse.
  4. Of special beauty or rare excellence.
  5. Exceeding; extreme; keen, in a bad or a good sense.
  6. Of delicate perception or close and accurate discrimination; not easy to satisfy; exact; fastidious.
    • his books of Oriental languages, wherein he was exquisite

Synonyms

  • beautiful, delicate, discriminating, perfect

Translations

Noun

exquisite (plural exquisites)

  1. (rare) Fop, dandy. [from early 20th c.]
    • 1849, Alexander Mackay, The western world; or, travels in the United States in 1846-87 (page 93)
      It is impossible to meet with a more finished coxcomb than a Broadway exquisite, or a “Broadway swell,” which is the designation attached to him on the spot.
    • 1925, P. G. Wodehouse, Sam the Sudden, Random House, London:2007, p. 42.
      So striking was his appearance that two exquisites, emerging from the Savoy Hotel and pausing on the pavement to wait for a vacant taxi, eyed him with pained disapproval as he approached, and then, starting, stared in amazement.

      ‘Good Lord!’ said the first exquisite.

Translations


German

Pronunciation

Adjective

exquisite

  1. inflection of exquisit:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

Latin

Participle

exquīsīte

  1. vocative masculine singular of exquīsītus

References

  • exquisite in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /kiːn/
  • (General American) enPR: kēn, IPA(key): /kin/
  • Rhymes: -iːn
  • Homophones: Keane, Keene

Etymology 1

From Middle English kene (bold, brave, sharp), from Old English cēne (keen, fierce, bold, brave, warlike, powerful; learned, clever, wise), from Proto-Germanic *kōniz (knowledgeable, skilful, experienced, clever, capable), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵneh₃- (to know). Cognate with Danish køn (handsome, pretty), Dutch kien (smart, wise, able), koen (daring, valiant, doughty, courageous), German kühn (bold, daring, audacious, hardy, valiant, venturesome), Icelandic kænn (wise, crafty, clever, able), Scots keen (lively, brisk; avaricious). Related to Old English cunnan (to know how to, be able to). More at cunning, can.

Alternative forms

  • keene, kene (both obsolete)

Adjective

keen (comparative keener or more keen, superlative keenest or most keen)

  1. (chiefly Commonwealth of Nations) Often with a prepositional phrase, or with to and an infinitive: showing a quick and ardent responsiveness or willingness; eager, enthusiastic, interested.
    • 2000, Jane Green, Bookends, London: Penguin Books, →ISBN; republished as Bookends: A Novel, trade paperback edition, New York, N.Y.: Broadway Books, 2003, →ISBN, page 304:
      In fact, she doesn’t mention the fact that I’ve obviously been avoiding her, just sounds genuinely thrilled to hear from me, and as soon as I mention getting together she suggests Monday, which is rather keen, even for Portia.
  2. Fierce, intense, vehement.
  3. Having a fine edge or point; sharp.
  4. Acute of mind, having or expressing mental acuteness; penetrating, sharp.
  5. Acrimonious, bitter, piercing.
  6. Of cold, wind, etc.: cutting, penetrating, piercing, sharp.
    • 1764 December 19 (indicated as 1765), Oliver Goldsmith, The Traveller, or a Prospect of Society. A Poem. Inscribed to the Rev. Henry Goldsmith, London: Printed for J[ohn] Newbery, →OCLC; 3rd edition, London: Printed for J. Newbury,[sic, meaning Newbery] in St. Paul’s Church-yard, 1765, →OCLC, page 10:
      Chearful at morn he wakes from ſhort repoſe, / Breaſts the keen air, and carolls as he goes; []
  7. (Britain) Of prices, extremely low as to be competitive.
  8. (US, informal, dated) Marvelous.
  9. (obsolete) Brave, courageous; audacious, bold.
Usage notes

Keen is often used to create compounds, the meaning of most of them being fairly obvious, for example, keen-edged, keen-eyed, keen-sighted, keen-witted, etc.

Synonyms
  • (showing a quick and ardent responsiveness or willingness): ardent, eager, prompt
  • (having a fine edge or point): sharp
  • (acrimonious): biting, cutting, piercing
  • (acute of mind): acute, penetrating, shrewd; see also Thesaurus:intelligent
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

keen (third-person singular simple present keens, present participle keening, simple past and past participle keened)

  1. (transitive, rare) To make cold, to sharpen.
    • 1730, James Thomson, “Summer”, in The Seasons, A Hymn, A Poem to the Memory of Sir Isaac Newton, and Britannia, a Poem, London, Printed for J. Millan, near Whitehall; and A[ndrew] Millar, in the Strand, →OCLC; republished in The Works of James Thomson. With His Last Corrections and Improvements. In Four Volumes, volume I, London: Printed for A. Millar, in the Strand, 1766, →OCLC, page 93, lines 1256–1259:
      This is the pureſt exerciſe of health, / The kind refreſher of the ſummer-heats; / Nor, when cold Winter keens the brightening flood, / Would I weak-ſhivering linger on the brink.

Etymology 2

From Irish caoin (to cry, weep; to keen).

Noun

keen (plural keens)

  1. A prolonged wail for a deceased person.

Verb

keen (third-person singular simple present keens, present participle keening, simple past and past participle keened)

  1. (intransitive) To utter a keen.
    • 20th century, Stuart Howard-Jones (1904–1974), “Hibernia”, in Kingsley Amis, comp., The New Oxford Book of English Light Verse, New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 1978, →ISBN, page 243:
      Last night he had put down too much Potheen / (A vulgar blend of Methyl and Benzene) / That, at some Wake, he might the better keen. / (Keen—meaning ‘brisk’? Nay, here the Language warps: / ‘Tis singing bawdy Ballads to a Corpse.)
  2. (transitive) To utter with a loud wailing voice or wordless cry.
  3. (transitive) To mourn.
Related terms
  • keener

References

Anagrams

  • Enke, kene, knee, kène, neek

Basque

Noun

keen

  1. genitive plural of ke

Hunsrik

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kʰeːn/

Particle

keen

  1. no, not any, not a

Declension

1Form used when the plural of the noun is the same as the singular

Further reading

  • Online Hunsrik Dictionary

Luxembourgish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /keːn/
    • Rhymes: -eːn

Particle

keen m or n

  1. no, not any, not a

Declension


Somali

Verb

keen

  1. bring

Yola

Etymology

From Middle English kene, from Old English cēne.

Adjective

keen

  1. sharp

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith

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