extend vs gallop what difference

what is difference between extend and gallop

English

Etymology

From Middle English extenden, from Anglo-Norman extendre, estendre, from Latin extendō (I stretch out).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛkˈstɛnd/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnd
  • Hyphenation: ex‧tend

Verb

extend (third-person singular simple present extends, present participle extending, simple past and past participle extended)

  1. (intransitive) To increase in extent.
  2. (intransitive) To possess a certain extent; to cover an amount of space.
    The desert extended for miles in all directions.
  3. (transitive) To cause to increase in extent.
  4. (transitive) To cause to last for a longer period of time.
  5. (transitive) To straighten (a limb).
  6. (transitive) To bestow; to offer; to impart; to apply.
    to extend sympathy to the suffering
    to extend credit to a valued customer
  7. To increase in quantity by weakening or adulterating additions.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of G. P. Burnham to this entry?)
    • 1897, Alonzo Lewis, James Robinson Newhall, History of Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts (page 155)
      [] the exalted morality of those virtuous brethren in the trade who, with consciences as weak as their own “extended” liquors, sought to convince him that to reduce the drink was a mercy to the poor deluded toper.
  8. (Britain, law) To value, as lands taken by a writ of extent in satisfaction of a debt; to assign by writ of extent.
  9. (object-oriented programming) Of a class: to be an extension or subtype of, or to be based on, a prototype or a more abstract class.
    Synonym: inherit
  10. (intransitive, US, military) To reenlist for a further period.
    • 1993, The Leatherneck (volume 76, page xxxvi)
      Two years later, back to amtracs, this time at Camp Schwab, Okinawa, and I liked it so much I extended.

Synonyms

  • enlarge
  • expand
  • increase
  • lengthen
  • stretch
  • widen

Related terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • dentex


English

Etymology

From Middle English galopen (to gallop), from Old French galoper (compare modern French galoper), from Frankish *wala hlaupan (to run well), from *wala (well) + *hlaupan (to run), from Proto-Germanic *hlaupaną (to run, leap, spring), from Proto-Indo-European *klaup-, *klaub- (to spring, stumble). Possibly also derived from a deverbal of Frankish *walhlaup (battle run) from *wal (battlefield) from a Proto-Germanic word meaning “dead, victim, slain” from Proto-Indo-European *wel- (death in battle, killed in battle) + *hlaup (course, track) from *hlaupan (to run). More at well, leap, valkyrie. See also the doublet wallop, coming from the same source through an Old Northern French variant.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡæləp/
  • Homophone: Gallup

Noun

gallop (plural gallops)

  1. The fastest gait of a horse, a two-beat stride during which all four legs are off the ground simultaneously.
  2. An abnormal rhythm of the heart, made up of three or four sounds, like a horse’s gallop.

Derived terms

  • Gish gallop

Translations

Verb

gallop (third-person singular simple present gallops, present participle galloping, simple past and past participle galloped)

  1. (intransitive, of a horse, etc) To run at a gallop.
  2. (intransitive) To ride at a galloping pace.
    • a. 1631, John Donne, Epithalamion Made at Lincoln’s Inn
      Gallop lively down the western hill.
  3. (transitive) To cause to gallop.
  4. (transitive, intransitive) To make electrical or other utility lines sway and/or move up and down violently, usually due to a combination of high winds and ice accrual on the lines.
  5. (intransitive) To run very fast.
  6. (figuratively, intransitive) To go rapidly or carelessly, as in making a hasty examination.
    • Such superficial ideas he may collect in galloping over it.
    • 1847, Anne Brontë, Agnes Grey
      Soon after breakfast Miss Matilda, having galloped and blundered through a few unprofitable lessons, and vengeably thumped the piano for an hour, in a terrible humour with both me and it, because her mama would not give her a holiday, []
  7. (intransitive, of an infection, especially pneumonia) To progress rapidly through the body.

Translations


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