extend vs offer what difference

what is difference between extend and offer

English

Etymology

From Middle English extenden, from Anglo-Norman extendre, estendre, from Latin extendō (I stretch out).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛkˈstɛnd/
  • Rhymes: -ɛnd
  • Hyphenation: ex‧tend

Verb

extend (third-person singular simple present extends, present participle extending, simple past and past participle extended)

  1. (intransitive) To increase in extent.
  2. (intransitive) To possess a certain extent; to cover an amount of space.
    The desert extended for miles in all directions.
  3. (transitive) To cause to increase in extent.
  4. (transitive) To cause to last for a longer period of time.
  5. (transitive) To straighten (a limb).
  6. (transitive) To bestow; to offer; to impart; to apply.
    to extend sympathy to the suffering
    to extend credit to a valued customer
  7. To increase in quantity by weakening or adulterating additions.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of G. P. Burnham to this entry?)
    • 1897, Alonzo Lewis, James Robinson Newhall, History of Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts (page 155)
      [] the exalted morality of those virtuous brethren in the trade who, with consciences as weak as their own “extended” liquors, sought to convince him that to reduce the drink was a mercy to the poor deluded toper.
  8. (Britain, law) To value, as lands taken by a writ of extent in satisfaction of a debt; to assign by writ of extent.
  9. (object-oriented programming) Of a class: to be an extension or subtype of, or to be based on, a prototype or a more abstract class.
    Synonym: inherit
  10. (intransitive, US, military) To reenlist for a further period.
    • 1993, The Leatherneck (volume 76, page xxxvi)
      Two years later, back to amtracs, this time at Camp Schwab, Okinawa, and I liked it so much I extended.

Synonyms

  • enlarge
  • expand
  • increase
  • lengthen
  • stretch
  • widen

Related terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • dentex


English

Alternative forms

  • offre (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɒfə(ɹ)/, /ˈɔːfə(ɹ)/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɔfɚ/
  • (cotcaught merger, Canada) IPA(key): /ˈɑfɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɒfə(ɹ), -ɔːfə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: of‧fer

Etymology 1

From Middle English offer, from Old English offrian (offer or make a sacrifice) rather than from Old French offre (offer), from offrir (to offer), from Latin offerō (to present, bring before). Compare North Frisian offer (sacrifice, donation, fee), Dutch offer (offering, sacrifice), German Opfer (victim, sacrifice), Danish offer (victim, sacrifice), Icelandic offr (offering). See verb below.

Noun

offer (plural offers)

  1. A proposal that has been made.
  2. Something put forth, bid, proffered or tendered.
  3. (law) An invitation to enter into a binding contract communicated to another party which contains terms sufficiently definite to create an enforceable contract if the other party accepts the invitation.
Derived terms
  • make an offer
Descendants
  • Tokelauan: ofo
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English offren, offrien, from Old English offrian (to offer, sacrifice, bring an oblation), from Latin offerō (to present, bestow, bring before, literally to bring to), from Latin ob + ferō (bring, carry), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer-, *bʰrē- (to carry, bear), later reinforced by Old French offrir (to offer). Cognate with Old Frisian offria (to offer), Old Dutch offrōn (to offer), German opfern (to offer), Old Norse offra (to offer). More at ob-, bear.

Verb

offer (third-person singular simple present offers, present participle offering, simple past and past participle offered)

  1. (intransitive) To propose or express one’s willingness (to do something).
  2. (transitive) To present in words; to proffer; to make a proposal of; to suggest.
  3. (transitive) To place at someone’s disposal; to present (something) to be either accepted or turned down.
  4. (transitive) To present (something) to God or gods as a gesture of worship, or for a sacrifice.
    • 1611, Bible (King James Version), Exodus xxix. 36
      Thou shalt offer every day a bullock for a sin offering for atonement.
  5. (transitive, engineering) To place (something) in a position where it can be added to an existing mechanical assembly.
  6. (transitive) To bid, as a price, reward, or wages.
  7. (intransitive) To happen, to present itself.
    • The occasion offers, and the youth complies.
  8. (obsolete) To make an attempt; typically used with at.
    • 1623, Francis Bacon, A Discourse of a War with Spain
      I will not offer at that I cannot master.
  9. (transitive) To put in opposition to; to manifest in an offensive way; to threaten.
Usage notes
  • This is a catenative verb that takes the to-infinitive. See Appendix:English catenative verbs
Related terms
  • offering
  • offertory
  • oblate
  • oblation
Translations

Etymology 3

off +‎ -er

Noun

offer (plural offers)

  1. (used in combinations from phrasal verbs) agent noun of off

Anagrams

  • offre, reffo

Danish

Noun

offer n (singular definite ofret or offeret, plural indefinite ofre)

  1. sacrifice
  2. victim

Inflection

Derived terms

  • slagteoffer
  • ofre

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɔfər/
  • Hyphenation: of‧fer
  • Rhymes: -ɔfər

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch offere, from Old Dutch [Term?].

Noun

offer n (plural offers, diminutive offertje n)

  1. sacrifice
  2. victim
Derived terms
  • brandoffer
  • offeren
  • plengoffer
  • reukoffer
  • slachtoffer
  • zoenoffer
Descendants
  • Negerhollands: offer
  • Papiamentu: offer (dated)

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

offer

  1. first-person singular present indicative of offeren
  2. imperative of offeren

Latin

Verb

offer

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of offerō

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse offr

Noun

offer n (definite singular offeret, indefinite plural offer or ofre, definite plural ofra or ofrene)

  1. a sacrifice
  2. a victim, a casualty

Derived terms

  • dødsoffer
  • selvmordsoffer

References

  • “offer” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse offr.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɔfɛr/ (example of pronunciation)

Noun

offer n (definite singular offeret, indefinite plural offer, definite plural offera)

  1. a sacrifice
  2. a victim, a casualty

Derived terms

  • dødsoffer

References

  • “offer” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse offr.

Pronunciation

Noun

offer n

  1. sacrifice
  2. victim

Declension

Derived terms

References

  • offer in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)
  • offer in Svensk ordbok (SO)
  • offer in Svenska Akademiens ordbok (SAOB)
  • offer in Elof Hellquist, Svensk etymologisk ordbok (1st ed., 1922)
  • offer in Knut Fredrik Söderwall, Ordbok öfver svenska medeltids-språket, del 2:1: M-T

Anagrams

  • Roffe

Welsh

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin offerenda.

Pronunciation

  • (North Wales, standard, colloquial) IPA(key): /ˈɔfɛr/
    • (North Wales, colloquial) IPA(key): /ˈɔfar/
  • (South Wales) IPA(key): /ˈoːfɛr/, /ˈɔfɛr/

Noun

offer f (plural offerau or offeriau or offrau)

  1. equipment

Mutation

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