extension vs reference what difference

what is difference between extension and reference

English

Etymology

From Middle English extensioun, from Old French estension, from Latin extensiō, extensiōnem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪkˈstɛnʃən/
  • Hyphenation: ex‧ten‧sion

Noun

extension (countable and uncountable, plural extensions)

  1. The act of extending; a stretching out; enlargement in length, breadth, or time; an increase
  2. The state of being extended
  3. That property of a body by which it occupies a portion of space (or time, e.g. “spatiotemporal extension”)
  4. A part of a building that has been extended from the original
  5. (semantics) Capacity of a concept or general term to include a greater or smaller number of objects; — correlative of intension.
    • In addition to concepts and conceptual senses, Frege holds that there are extensions of concepts. Frege calls an extension of a concept a ‘course of values’. A course of values is determined by the value that the concept has for each of its arguments. Thus, the course of values for the concept __ is a dog records that its value for the argument Zermela is the True and for Socrates is the False, and so on. If two concepts have the same values for every argument, then their courses of values are the same. Thus, courses of values are extensional.
  6. (banking, finance) A written engagement on the part of a creditor, allowing a debtor further time to pay a debt.
  7. (medicine) The operation of stretching a broken bone so as to bring the fragments into the same straight line.
  8. (weightlifting) An exercise in which an arm or leg is straightened against resistance.
  9. (fencing) A simple offensive action, consisting of extending the weapon arm forward.
  10. (telecommunications) A numerical code used to specify a specific telephone in a telecommunication network.
  11. (computing) A file extension.
  12. (computing) An optional software component that adds functionality to an application.
  13. (logic) The set of tuples of values that, used as arguments, satisfy the predicate.
  14. (grammar) A kind of derivative morpheme applied to verbs in Bantu languages.

Synonyms

  • (semantics): denotation

Antonyms

  • (act of extending): shortening
  • (exercise): curl

Derived terms

Related terms

  • extend (verb)
  • extense
  • extent
  • (semantics): intension
  • (semantics): comprehension

Translations

See also

  • flexion

Anagrams

  • in extenso

Brunei Malay

Etymology

Borrowed from English extension.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ekstenʃən/
  • Hyphenation: ex‧ten‧sion

Noun

extension

  1. (colloquial) extension cord (electrical cord with multi-port socket)

French

Etymology

From Old French estension, borrowed from Latin extentiō, extentiōnem.

Pronunciation

Noun

extension f (plural extensions)

  1. extension

Derived terms

  • module d’extension

Related terms

  • étendre

Further reading

  • “extension” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


For information on how references should be handled on Wiktionary, see Wiktionary:References

English

Etymology

From Middle French référence, from Medieval Latin referentia, nominative neuter plural of referēns, present participle of referō (return, reply, literally carry back).

Morphologically refer +‎ -ence.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹɛf.(ə)ɹəns/
  • (obsolete) IPA(key): /ˈɹɛfəɹɛns/
  • Hyphenation: ref‧er‧ence

Noun

reference (countable and uncountable, plural references)

  1. (literary or archaic) A relationship or relation (to something).
  2. A measurement one can compare to.
  3. Information about a person, provided by someone (a referee) with whom they are well acquainted.
  4. A person who provides this information; a referee.
  5. A reference work.
  6. (attributive) That which serves as a reference work.
  7. The act of referring: a submitting for information or decision.
  8. (semantics) A relation between objects in which one object designates, or acts as a means by which to connect to or link to, another object.
  9. (academic writing) A short written identification of a previously published work which is used as a source for a text.
  10. (academic writing) A previously published written work thus indicated; a source.
  11. (computing) An object containing information which refers to data stored elsewhere, as opposed to containing the data itself.
  12. (programming, character entity) A special sequence used to represent complex characters in markup languages, such as ™ for the ™ symbol.
  13. (obsolete) Appeal.

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • sense
  • handle

Verb

reference (third-person singular simple present references, present participle referencing, simple past and past participle referenced)

  1. To provide a list of references for (a text).
  2. To refer to, to use as a reference.
  3. To mention, to cite.
  4. (programming) To contain the value that is a memory address of some value stored in memory.

Usage notes

Some authorities object to the use of reference as a verb with a meaning other than “provide a list of references for,” preferring refer to or cite in these cases. Others allow the meaning “refer to” but reject “mention.” Nevertheless, the proscribed usages are common in both writing and speech.

Related terms

  • referee
  • referent
  • referential
  • relate
  • relation

Translations

References

Further reading

  • reference in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • reference in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • reference at OneLook Dictionary Search

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