extenuate vs palliate what difference

what is difference between extenuate and palliate

English

Etymology

From Latin extenuātus, past participle of extenuāre (to make thin, loosen, weaken) from ex (out) + tenuāre (to make thin), from tenuis (thin).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪkˈstɛnjueɪt/

Verb

extenuate (third-person singular simple present extenuates, present participle extenuating, simple past and past participle extenuated)

  1. (transitive, said of something negative) To lessen; to palliate; to lessen or weaken the force of; to diminish the extent or severity of
    • 1833, Isaac Taylor, Saturday Evening
      Let us then contemplate this companion of our existence;—and let us extenuate, conceal, adorn the unpleasing reality.
  2. (archaic, transitive) To make thin or slender; to draw out so as to lessen the thickness.
    • 1681, Nehemiah Grew, Musaeum Regalis Societatis
      His body behind the head becomes broad, from whence it is again extenuated all the way to the tail.
  3. (archaic, intransitive) To become thinner.
  4. (obsolete) To lower or degrade; to detract from.

Synonyms

  • (lessen; diminish): mitigate

Antonyms

  • (lessen; diminish): aggravate

Related terms

Translations


Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ek.ste.nuˈaː.te/, [ɛks̠t̪ɛnuˈäːt̪ɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ek.ste.nuˈa.te/, [ɛkst̪ɛnuˈɑːt̪ɛ]

Verb

extenuāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of extenuō


English

Etymology

From Latin palliatus (cloaked) (in Late Latin the past participle of palliare (to cover with a cloak)), from pallium (cloak).

Pronunciation

  • (verb) IPA(key): /ˈpælieɪt/
  • (adjective) IPA(key): /ˈpæliət/

Verb

palliate (third-person singular simple present palliates, present participle palliating, simple past and past participle palliated)

  1. To relieve the symptoms of; to ameliorate. [from 15th c.]
    • 2009, Boris Johnson, The Evening Standard, 15 Jan 09:
      And if there are some bankers out there who are still embarrassed by the size of their bonuses, then I propose that they palliate their guilt by giving to the Mayor’s Fund for London to help deprived children in London.
  2. (obsolete) To hide or disguise. [16th-19th c.]
  3. To cover or disguise the seriousness of (a mistake, offence etc.) by excuses and apologies. [from 17th c.]
    • April 5 1628, Bishop Joseph Hall, The Blessings, Sins, and Judgments of God’s Vineyard
      We extenuate not our guilt : whatever we sin , we condemn it as mortal : they palliate wickedness , with the fair pretence of veniality
  4. (obsolete) To lessen the severity of; to extenuate, moderate, qualify. [17th-18th c.]
    • 1924, Herman Melville, Billy Budd, London: Constable & Co., Chapter 18, [1]
      If, mindless of palliating circumstances, we are bound to regard the death of the Master-at-arms as the prisoner’s deed, then does that deed constitute a capital crime whereof the penalty is a mortal one?
  5. To placate or mollify. [from 17th c.]
    • 2007, “Looking towards a Brown future”, The Guardian, 25 Jan 07:
      Brown’s options for the machinery of Whitehall are constrained, as for all prime ministers, by the need to palliate allies and hug enemies close (John Reid, say).

Related terms

  • palliation
  • palliative
  • pallium

Translations

Adjective

palliate (comparative more palliate, superlative most palliate)

  1. (obsolete) Cloaked; hidden, concealed. [15th-17th c.]
  2. (obsolete) Eased; mitigated; alleviated.
    • 1661, John Fell, The life of the most learned, reverend, and pious Dr. H. Hammond
      [the] most helpful method of its Cure, which yet if palliate and imperfect would onely make way to more fatal Sickness

References

  • Paternoster, Lewis M. and Frager-Stone, Ruth. Three Dimensions of Vocabulary Growth. Second Edition. Amsco School Publications: USA. 1998.

Latin

Adjective

palliāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of palliātus

References

  • palliate in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

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