extinguish vs stub what difference

what is difference between extinguish and stub

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin extinguo (to put out (what is burning), quench, extinguish, deprive of life, destroy, abolish), from ex (out) + stinguere (to put out, quench, extinguish).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪkˈstɪŋ.ɡwɪʃ/

Verb

extinguish (third-person singular simple present extinguishes, present participle extinguishing, simple past and past participle extinguished)

  1. (transitive) to put out, as in fire; to end burning; to quench
  2. (transitive) to destroy or abolish something
    She extinguished all my hopes.
    They intended to extinguish the enemy by force of numbers
    • 1668 December 19, James Dalrymple, “Mr. Alexander Seaton contra Menzies” in The Deciſions of the Lords of Council & Seſſion I (Edinburgh, 1683), page 575
      The Pupil after his Pupillarity, had granted a Diſcharge to one of the Co-tutors, which did extinguiſh the whole Debt of that Co-tutor, and conſequently of all the reſt, they being all correi debendi, lyable by one individual Obligation, which cannot be Diſcharged as to one, and ſtand as to all the reſt.
  3. (transitive) to obscure or eclipse something
    The rays of the sun were extinguished by the thunder clouds.
    A beauty that extinguishes all others by comparison
  4. (transitive, psychology) to bring about the extinction of a conditioned reflex
    Many patients can extinguish their phobias after a few months of treatment.
  5. (transitive, literally) to hunt down (a species) to extinction
  6. (intransitive) To die out.

Synonyms

  • put out, quench, douse
  • See also Thesaurus:destroy

Related terms

  • distinguish
  • extinct
  • extinction
  • extinguisher
  • fire extinguisher

Translations

Further reading

  • extinguish in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • extinguish in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.


English

Etymology

From Middle English stubbe (tree stump), from Old English stybb, stubb (tree stump), from Proto-Germanic *stubbaz (compare Middle Dutch stubbe, Old Norse stubbr), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tew-; compare steep (sharp slope).

Sense extended in Middle English to similarly shaped objects. Verb sense “strike one’s toe” is recorded 1848; “extinguish a cigarette” 1927.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: stŭb, IPA(key): /stʌb/
  • Rhymes: -ʌb

Noun

stub (plural stubs)

  1. Something blunted, stunted, or cut short, such as stubble or a stump.
    • And prickly stubs instead of trees are found.
  2. A piece of certain paper items, designed to be torn off and kept for record or identification purposes.
    check stub, ticket stub, payment stub
  3. (computing) A placeholder procedure that has the signature of the planned procedure but does not yet implement the intended behavior.
    • [1], [2], [3]
    • 1996, Chip Weems, Nell Dale, Pascal:
      Even though the stub is a dummy, it allows us to determine whether the procedure is called at the right time by the program or calling procedure.
  4. (computing) A procedure that translates requests from external systems into a format suitable for processing and then submits those requests for processing.
    • [4], [5], [6]
    • 2002, Judith M Myerson, The Complete Book of Middleware:
      After this, the server stub calls the actual procedure on the server.
  5. (wikis) A page providing only minimal information and intended for later development.
  6. The remaining part of the docked tail of a dog
  7. An unequal first or last interest calculation period, as a part of a financial swap contract
  8. (obsolete) A log or block of wood.
  9. (obsolete) A blockhead.
  10. A pen with a short, blunt nib.
  11. An old and worn horseshoe nail.
  12. Stub iron.
  13. The smallest remainder of a smoked cigarette; a butt.

Antonyms

  • (computing) skeleton (4)

Hyponyms

  • stubble
  • stump

Derived terms

  • pencil stub
  • pay stub

Translations

Verb

stub (third-person singular simple present stubs, present participle stubbing, simple past and past participle stubbed)

  1. (transitive) To remove most of a tree, bush, or other rooted plant by cutting it close to the ground.
  2. (transitive) To remove a plant by pulling it out by the roots.
  3. (transitive) To jam, hit, or bump, especially a toe.
    I stubbed my toe trying to find the light switch in the dark.

Derived terms

  • unstubbed

Translations

References

Further reading

  • stub in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • stub in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • stub at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • BTUs, TBUs, bust, but’s, buts, tubs

Serbo-Croatian

Alternative forms

  • stȗp

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *stъlbъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stûːb/

Noun

stȗb m (Cyrillic spelling сту̑б)

  1. pillar
  2. column (upright supporting beam)

Declension


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